Life Beyond Uranus: Remembering a Golden Age of San Francisco Nightlife
Mar
21
7:00 PM19:00

Life Beyond Uranus: Remembering a Golden Age of San Francisco Nightlife

Location

GLBT Historical Society Museum, 4127 18th St., San Francisco, CA 94114

Admission

$5.00 | Free for members

*Limited Seating, advance RSVP recommended.

RSVP and purchase tickets here

Legendary club kids, DJs, queer punks, DIY fashionistas, nightlife promoters and club owners gather to share their scandalous stories of nightlife before the Internet (1980s – 1990s).

They'll recount stories from San Francisco queer clubs such as Uranus, The Stud, The Box, The Eagle, Colossus, Universe and more. Notorious outfits, artifacts and looks from both the denizens’ personal collections and the GLBT Historical Society’s archives will be shown, highlighting how a resilient nightlife scene helped a community weather the darkest years of the AIDS crisis.

Special guest panelists include:

Jennifer "Junkyard" Morris—DJ and promoter of the Junk party at the Stud

Page Hodel—DJ and promoter of the diverse and women-centered Box and Club Q parties.

Lewis Walden—DJ and promoter of Club Uranus and Club Chaos

Gus Bean— proprietor of the Colossus and Atlas parties, as well as many more early "circuit" parties.

Melissa Hawkins—Photographer and multidisciplinary designer.

Moderated by Marke Bieschke—Nightlife historian who specializes in queer dance music and club history.

This program is part of the SoMa Nights: The Queer Club Photography of Melissa Hawkins exhibition, on view through May 27, 2019.

Photo credit: Melissa Hawkins, Dancer, Folsom (1991); used with permission.

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Fighting Back | The L and the GBTQ: Visibility, Leadership and Political Power
Mar
28
7:00 PM19:00

Fighting Back | The L and the GBTQ: Visibility, Leadership and Political Power

Location

GLBT Historical Society Museum, 4127 18th St., San Francisco, CA 94114

Admission

$5.00 | Free for members

*Limited Seating, advance RSVP recommended.

RSVP and purchase tickets here

The latest in the GLBT Historical Society’s monthly “Fighting Back” series exploring contemporary queer issues in a historical context, this community forum will focus on the struggles and successes of lesbians in relationship to history, the LGBTQ community and coalition building in the Bay Area.

A panel of historians, community organizers and advocates will explore how lesbian identity and community have evolved over time while underlining how this history can help inform today’s resistance movements.

List of panelists coming soon.

Photo credit: San Francisco Gay Freedom Day Parade (1977); photograph by Marie Ueda; collection of the GLBT Historical Society.

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Flashing After Dark: Queer Nightlife Photography Then and Now
Mar
7
7:00 PM19:00

Flashing After Dark: Queer Nightlife Photography Then and Now

Location

GLBT Historical Society Museum, 4127 18th St., San Francisco, CA 94114

Admission

$5.00 | Free for members

*Limited Seating, advance RSVP recommended.

RSVP and purchase tickets here

Meet photographer Melissa Hawkins! She'll be speaking about her work, and what it was like to take nightlife pictures before digital photography. 

A panel of contemporary and classic nightlife photographers and writers will join Melissa Hawkins to share their favorite photographs and stories of venturing into the night. They will also discuss their professional methods, techniques, and address the challenges and rewards of ever-changing camera technologies, the rise of social media and selfies, and evolving denizens' attitudes toward being photographed in the midst of debauchery.

We will also screen the latest installment of the "Fathers" project, by local nightlife photographer and filmmaker Leo Herrera, which imagines an alternate future where AIDS and STDs were eradicated via a surprising part of gay party culture.     

MODERATOR

Marke Bieschke is a nightlife historian who specializes in queer dance music and club history. He has written about Bay Area queer nightlife for more than two decades. He serves as the publisher and arts editor for 48 Hills and the SF Bay Guardian. He is a member of the Stud Collective, which owns the 52-year-old San Francisco queer bar The Stud.

Marke is the co-author of Queer: The Ultimate LGBTQ Guide for Teens (Zest Books, 2011) and the forthcoming Into the Streets: A History of Protest in the United States. His writing has appeared in magazines and newspapers including The Advocate, The Guardian, The New Yorker and Vice and has been featured on NPR and affiliates of ABC, CBS, NBC and PBS.

PANELISTS

Melissa Hawkins is a photographer and multidisciplinary designer. Her photographic oeuvre of the 1980s and 1990s captured San Francisco’s queer community. Many of the images were taken in the South of Market (SoMa) neighborhood in clubs popular during the era.Hawkins holds a degree in industrial design from San Francisco State University and studied product design at Brunel University in England.

Gareth Gooch was born in the UK and attended the prestigious Newport College of Art and Design where he studied under British photographer David Hurn, of the Magnum Photos collaborative. He worked in London for two decades first apprenticing with important photography studios and later having his own firm. The focus of his work in the last few years has been on documenting the disenfranchised sub-cultures of our time: the dynamism of street art and the artists who create it; the recent LGBT political struggle with marriage equality; and the LGBT performing arts community.

Gooch is resident photographer at weekly and monthly nights at various clubs including Beaux, The Stud, The Edge and Glamcocks. He is the official photographer of the SF Gay Men’s Chorus and his photos are regularly featured in the Bay Area Reporter and LEFT magazine where he has a monthly column called “Out and About with Gooch”.

Rick Gerharter is a San Francisco based photojournalist who has documented the queer communities of San Francisco for nearly 33 years. He is regularly published in the Bay Area Reporter of San Francisco and in a wide variety of periodicals, newspapers, books, films and exhibitions. He is a contributor to Getty Images. His work is in the collection of the Hormel Center at the San Francisco Public Library.

This program is part of the SoMa Nights: The Queer Club Photography of Melissa Hawkins exhibition, on view through May 27, 2019.

Photo credit: Melissa Hawkins, Duo with Cigar, The Eagle (undated); used with permission.

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Lana and Lilly Wachowski: Sensing Transgender
Mar
1
7:00 PM19:00

Lana and Lilly Wachowski: Sensing Transgender

Location

GLBT Historical Society Museum, 4127 18th St., San Francisco, CA 94114

Admission

$5.00 | Free for members

*Limited Seating, advance RSVP recommended.

RSVP and purchase tickets here

Lana and Lilly Wachowski have redefined the cinematically possible while joyfully defying audience expectations. Visionary works like Bound (1996), The Matrix trilogy (1999-2003), and Sense8 (2015-18) have made them the world's most influential transgender media producers, and their coming out revealed how transgender art has existed at the very center of American culture.

In Lana and Lilly Wachowski: Sensing Transgender, Cáel M. Keegan explores the Wachowskis's films as both a historical record of transgender experience and a promise that we might learn "to sense beyond the limits of the given world."

Keegan discusses how the filmmakers take up the relationships between identity and coding, gender and the senses, and race and utopia to present a popular transgender aesthetic in which the plasticity of cinema creates new social worlds, new temporalities, and new bodily sensations.

Cáel M. Keegan is Assistant Professor of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Liberal Studies at Grand Valley State University.

Photo credit: Cáel M. Keegan; used with permission.

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Fighting Back | Love, Marriage and Queers: 15 Years of Bliss?
Feb
28
7:00 PM19:00

Fighting Back | Love, Marriage and Queers: 15 Years of Bliss?

Location

GLBT Historical Society Museum, 4127 18th St., San Francisco, CA 94114

Admission

$5.00 | Free for members

*Limited Seating, advance RSVP recommended.

RSVP and purchase tickets here

The latest in the GLBT Historical Society's monthly "Fighting Back" series exploring contemporary queer issues in a historical context, this community panel will look back at the history and outcomes of the marriage equality movement in San Francisco and nationally, 15 years after Gavin Newsom -- then mayor of San Francisco and now governor of California -- mandated the issuing of marriage licenses for same-sex couples in San Francisco.

Dubbed an act of "civic disobedience" in violation of state law, the short-lived authorization sparked San Francisco's "Winter of Love," when some 4,000 same-sex couples rushed to formalize their relationships. 

MODERATOR: Julie Nice teaches constitutional, sexuality and poverty law at the University of San Francisco School of Law, where she is the Herbst Foundation Professor of Law. She writes regularly about LGBTQ rights and economic justice. She has won 14 awards for teaching excellence and was featured as one of the nation's top 25 law teachers in "What the Best Law Teachers Do "(Harvard 2013). She has written and made over 40 public presentations about same-sex marriage.

PANELISTS:

Anna Eng

Kara Korbel Chinula - love warrior, marriage equality activist, participant in the "winter of love 2004" and the "national marriage equality express" in October 2004 . Believer in all persons human dignity to legally live and love freely to the detriment of none. Grew up in Minnesota arrived in Bay Area 25 years ago. Career in affordable housing in the east bay. Graduate of the USF School of Law.

John Lewis and Stuart Gaffney were one of the first 10 couples to marry during San Francisco’s 2004 Winter of Love. When the California Supreme Court nullified the Winter of Love marriages, they became one of the plaintiff couples in the historic 2008 lawsuit that established marriage equality in California before Proposition 8. For years, John was Legal and Policy Director of Marriage Equality USA, and Stuart was the Communications Director. They were also leaders of API Equality, a coalition that both brought Asian American visibility to the marriage equality movement and targeted outreach and education to the Asian American community. Today, they are regular columnists for the SF Bay Times newspaper and continue their educational work nationally and internationally through the nonprofit organization Marriage Equality. Here is a link to their current SF Bay Times column: Happy 15th Anniversary of San Francisco’s “Winter of Love”: http://sfbaytimes.com/happy-15th-anniversary-san-franciscos-winter-love/

Ruth Villasenor, a Chiricahua Apache, Mexican woman who identifies as Two Spirit, and has been a member of BAAITS for over 19 years. Her and her partner of 21 years, are one of the 18,000 legally married couples in California. The owners of Paws & Claws Oakland, their business became a drop off point for Prop 8 signage and updates on local activities during the 2008 election. She became the Native American Outreach Director for Marriage Equality USA, realizing the continued education needed for people to understand what equality truly means. Her painful experience during the prop 8 rallies in Oakland inspired her to create a film, "Traditional Indigenous Values" a 8min. documentary reflecting on historical acceptance of two spirit people, the effects of colonization and Prop. 8. She has worked hard bridging communities together, reconnecting natives to cultural traditions and non-natives to the gay/two-spirit community.

Photo credit: San Francisco Pride Parade, 2018. Photo Courtesy of Ruth Villaseñor.

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Exhibition Opening | SoMa Nights: The Queer Club Photography of Melissa Hawkins
Feb
15
7:00 PM19:00

Exhibition Opening | SoMa Nights: The Queer Club Photography of Melissa Hawkins

Location

GLBT Historical Society Museum, 4127 18th St., San Francisco, CA 94114

Admission

$5.00 | Free for members

*Limited Seating, advance RSVP recommended.

RSVP and purchase tickets here

A new exhibition highlighting the extraordinary vitality of queer nightlife in San Francisco's South of Market (SoMa) district during the darkest years of the AIDS crisis, an era that simultaneously marked the peak of AIDS activism and queer militant organizing in the city.

SoMa Nights: The Queer Club Photography of Melissa Hawkins focuses on the work of Melissa Hawkins, a young photographer for the San Francisco gay weekly The Sentinel and other publications from 1986 to 1994. Her black-and-white images vividly capture the scene with a combination of frankness and intimacy reflecting her dual roles as journalist and nightlife participant.

In an era before digital photography and at a time when some LGBTQ people were still hesitant to make their identities public, Hawkins had both the gear required to shoot first-rate photos and the connections needed to gain the trust of her subjects. The results are powerful images documenting parties at 177 Townsend, 1015 Folsom, The Eagle, The End Up, The Rawhide and The Stud in SoMa, as well as The Box in the Western Addition.

Co-curated by Hawkins and nightlife historian Marke B., the GLBT Historical Society Museum show will feature dozens of these never-before-displayed photos, along with memorabilia including flyers, posters, clothing and decorative artifacts selected to recreate an indelible moment in San Francisco and queer nightlife history. Special events associated with the show will include dance parties and celebrity panel discussions.

The opening reception will feature DJ Junkyard of legendary club Junk, some of San Francisco’s best known nightlife personalities, and brief remarks by the curators. Light refreshments will be served.

Drink Sponsor: Precept WineFort Point Beer Company and The Stud

Photo credit: Melissa Hawkins, Phatima and MichaelAngelo (undated); used with permission.

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Judy, Oz and the Need for a Shared History
Feb
13
7:00 PM19:00

Judy, Oz and the Need for a Shared History

  • GLBT Historical Society Museum (map)
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Location

GLBT Historical Society Museum, 4127 18th St., San Francisco, CA 94114

Admission

$5.00 | Free for members

*Limited Seating, advance RSVP recommended.

RSVP and purchase tickets here

Author Dee Michel, author of Friends of Dorothy: Why Gay Boys and Gay Men Love The Wizard of Oz, discusses the strong connection between the The Wizard of Oz starring Judy Garland, and Anglo-American gay male culture.

Some beliefs about Judy Garland and The Wizard of Oz are:
• The movie has been a gay favorite since 1939.
• ‘Friend of Dorothy’ refers to Garland as Dorothy.
• It’s no coincidence the Stonewall Riots occurred the night of Garland’s funeral.
• The rainbow flag is related to “Over the Rainbow.”

These statements are probably not true; they seem to be folkloric beliefs that provide a sense of gay identity and gay history. This presentation will be followed by an audience Q&A and book signing.

Dee Michel has just written Friends of Dorothy: Why Gay Boys and Gay Men Love The Wizard of Oz and has given many talks on the Oz–gay connection. His article on gay men and Oz, which appeared in the /Baum Bugle/ in 2002, was mentioned by readers as a favorite article in a 2011 poll. He has talked about the topic at the Library of Congress, academic conferences, gay studies classes, Oz conventions and at Boston’s GLBT Youth Pride rally. Dee’s father, Martin Michel, was gay himself and read the Oz books as bedtime stories to Dee and his brother, and passed along to Dee the books he had as a child. He served as a volunteer at Boston's Gay Community News and as the first male co-chair of the Gay Task Force of the American Library Association. Dee has Masters and PhD degrees in library and information science and lives in Northampton, Massachusetts.

Photo credit: Dee Michel by Gaku Shiroma.

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Two-Spirit Voices: Returning to the Circle | Exhibition Opening
Jan
31
7:00 PM19:00

Two-Spirit Voices: Returning to the Circle | Exhibition Opening

Location

GLBT Historical Society Museum, 4127 18th St., San Francisco, CA 94114

Admission

$5 | Free for members

*Limited Seating, advance RSVP recommended.

RSVP and purchase tickets here

A new exhibition at the GLBT Historical Society Museum celebrating the 20th anniversary of Bay Area American Indian Two-Spirits, an organization committed to activism and service to the two-spirit and ally communities of the San Francisco Bay Area.

Curators Roger Kuhn, Amelia Vigil and Ruth Villaseñor focus on four main themes: gay and two-spirit pride, theannual BAAITS Two-Spirit Powwow, indigenous medicine and responses to HIV/AIDS, and two-spirit meaning within indigenous communities. Drawing on regalia and textiles, medicines and herbs, and photography and video on loan from community members, as well as materials recently donated to the GLBT Historical Society archives, the exhibition highlights the resiliency of two-spirit people.

The opening reception will feature brief remarks by the curators. Light refreshments will be served.

Photo credit: Artwork for BAAITS’ First Annual Powwow, February 11, 2012.  Artwork created by Michael Horse (signed). On loan from Bay Area American Indian Two Spirits (BAAITS), used with permission (all rights reserved).

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Fighting Back | Stop AIDS Now or Else: Protest as Community Catalyst
Jan
24
7:00 PM19:00

Fighting Back | Stop AIDS Now or Else: Protest as Community Catalyst

Location

GLBT Historical Society Museum, 4127 18th St., San Francisco, CA 94114

Admission

Free | $5 donation welcome

*Limited Seating, advance RSVP recommended.

RSVP and purchase tickets here

The latest in the GLBT Historical Society's monthly "Fighting Back" series exploring contemporary queer issues in a historical context, this community forum commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Stop AIDS Now or Else sit-in on the Golden Gate Bridge during morning rush hour on January 21, 1989. Bringing traffic on the bridge to a halt, the activists insisted there would be "no more business as usual" until the government and society as a whole addressed the AIDS crisis. 

SANOE brought together a diverse group of individuals from a range of organizations to carry out innovative and highly visible protests centered on nonviolent direct action. Their efforts helped build a wider community movement for understanding inequality and galvanizing change.

A panel of allies, organizers, activists and historians will reflect on what it meant to be an AIDS activist and organizer then, and how that activism has shifted over time according to our needs today.

Moderated by: Deborah Gould

Panelists include: Deeg Gold, Waiyde Palmer, Mike Shriver

Photo credit: Activists from Stop AIDS Now or Else staged a sit-in on the Golden Gate Bridge during morning rush hour on January 21, 1989 -- the only time in history protesters halted traffic on the bridge. Photo: Rick Gerharter; used with permission.

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REX RAY: How To Make a Rex Ray
Dec
13
7:00 PM19:00

REX RAY: How To Make a Rex Ray

Location

GLBT Historical Society Museum, 4127 18th St., San Francisco, CA 94114

Admission

$5 | Free for members

RSVP and purchase tickets here - Limited Seating: RSVP Required

No other contemporary artist mastered the hand-crafted aesthetic of fine art while pushing the limits of graphic design more than Rex Ray (1956–2015). In the documentary feature REX RAY: How to Make a Rex Ray (2009), the artist takes viewers on a tour from his hometown in Colorado Springs to his studio in San Francisco, revealing his artistic process and everyday practice. Whether creating a painting or donating a graphic design, Rex Ray continually reinvented a language to speak in the worlds of both art and computer graphics.

Griff Williams, Owner and Founder of GALLERY 16, will be in conversation with the film’s Director Joshua V. Hassel after the screening. Program held in conjunction with our current Front Gallery exhibition, “A Picture Is a Word: The Posters of Rex Ray.”

Photo credit: Film still from 'REX RAY: How to Make a Rex Ray' by Joshua V. Hassel. Used with permission.

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We Built a Movement from Books
Dec
6
7:00 PM19:00

We Built a Movement from Books

Location

GLBT Historical Society Museum, 4127 18th St., San Francisco, CA 94114

Admission

$5 | Free for members

RSVP and purchase tickets here

A panel of creators of queer culture will reminisce about the impetus books gave to the lesbian and gay movement in the 1970s–1980. The explosion of bookstores, publishing houses, organizational libraries and literature courses was an important component of San Francisco's struggle for identity and community. In the years between Stonewall and the AIDS epidemic, lesbians and gay men separately and together charted new territory, established a tradition and literally changed and saved lives.

Historian James Van Buskirk will interview gay studies pioneer Jack Collins and groundbreaking feminist publisher and bookseller Carol Seajay.

Photo credit: Carol Seajay, Pell, Sherry Thomas, Tiana Arruda and Kit Quan at Old Wives Tales in San Francisco (1982), photo by Joan E. Biren (JEB)

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Listen Up! Voices of AIDS Activism
Nov
29
7:00 PM19:00

Listen Up! Voices of AIDS Activism

Location

GLBT Historical Society Museum, 4127 18th St., San Francisco, CA 94114

Admission

Free | $5 donation welcome

RSVP and get free tickets here

The first public showing of video interviews from the GLBT Historical Society's ongoing San Francisco ACT UP Oral History Project documenting the history of direct-action AIDS activism in the Bay Area.

The full videos will eventually be made available to researchers and will form the basis of an exhibition in our museum, providing new insights into the contributions of activists as LGBTQ people and people with AIDS fought against the epidemic and the lethally slow response of the government.

Current project manager Eric Sneathen will lead a discussion after the screenings and video clip introductions by Lauren Levin, Irwin Swirnoff and Patrick Martin-Tuite.

This project was made possible with support from California Humanities, a non-profit partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Visit www.calhum.org.

Photo credit: ACT UP/San Francisco protest march (1988). Photo by Marc Geller; used with permission.

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Fighting Back: Harvey Milk's Living Legacy
Nov
28
7:00 PM19:00

Fighting Back: Harvey Milk's Living Legacy

  • GLBT Historical Society Museum (map)
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Location

GLBT Historical Society Museum, 4127 18th St., San Francisco, CA 94114

Admission

$5 | Free for members

RSVP and purchase tickets here

The latest in the GLBT Historical Society's monthly "Fighting Back" series exploring contemporary queer issues in a historical context, this community forum will highlight the living legacy of Harvey Milk and how it continues to inspire progressive, coalition-based political and electoral organizing in San Francisco and beyond.

Commemorating the 40th anniversary of the assassination of Harvey Milk and his ally Mayor George Moscone on November 27, 1978, a panel of historians, veteran organizers and young activists will assess how the events of 1978 affected the progressive movement in the city—and how Milk's example continues to inspire work for positive change today.

Panelists include Tom Ammiano, Brad Chapin, Pablo Espinoza, Cleve Jones, Ken Jones, Ani Rivera and Don Romesburg. Moderated by Honey Mahogany.

Cosponsored by the Harvey Milk LGBT Democratic Club.

Photo credit: Harvey Milk 1973 Campaign. Crawford Barton Collection, GLBT Historical Society Archives.

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Reading Two-Spirit Tales for Children
Nov
3
2:00 PM14:00

Reading Two-Spirit Tales for Children

Location

GLBT Historical Society Museum, 4127 18th St., San Francisco, CA 94114

Admission

Free with advance tickets through EventBrite (below) or contact Nalini Elias at nalini@glbthistory.org/415-777-5455 x6) | Free for members

$5 general admission to museum | $3 students

RSVP and purchase tickets here

An afternoon of story time for children presented by members of Bay Area American Indian Two Spirits (BAAITS) to create visibility for LGBTQ native peoples and to celebrate the diversity of genders, ethnicities and cultures in the Bay Area.

Drag queen Landa Lakes will read 47,000 Beads, a book about Two Spirit acceptance written by Koja Adeyoha and Angel Adeyoha. Ruth Villasenor will read Rainbow Crow: A Lenape Tale, a Native American legend written by Nancy Van Laan that symbolizes the values of selflessness and service to the community.

Cosponsored by BAAITS.

Photo credit: 47,000 Beads by Koja Adeyoha and Angel Adeyoha (2017)

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The Indian is Still Alive: Two Spirit History & Drumming
Nov
1
7:00 PM19:00

The Indian is Still Alive: Two Spirit History & Drumming

Location

GLBT Historical Society Museum, 4127 18th St., San Francisco, CA 94114

Admission

$5 | Free for members

RSVP and purchase tickets here

An evening of music and history with the Bay Area American Indian Two Spirits (BAAITS) drum group, including a screening of the documentary short The Indian is Still Alive and the Indian Knows the Songs directed by BAAITS drum member Susana Caceres, followed by songs by the BAAITS drum group and an audience discussion.

The evening brings together arts, music, dance, culture and traditions to help educate natives, nonnatives and all LGBTQ people. Cosponsored by BAAITS.

Photo credit: Still from "The Indian is Still Alive and the Indian Knows the Songs," a film directed by Susana Caceres.

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Fighting Back: Health and Wellness for LGBTQ People
Oct
24
7:00 PM19:00

Fighting Back: Health and Wellness for LGBTQ People

Location

GLBT Historical Society Museum, 4127 18th St., San Francisco, CA 94114

Admission

Free | $5 donation welcome

RSVP and purchase tickets here

The latest in the GLBT Historical Society's monthly "Fighting Back" series exploring contemporary queer issues in a historical context, this community forum will outline how social, physical and mental health resources for LGBTQ people first emerged in San Francisco and will address how to further strengthen and care for LGBTQ communities.

A panel of historians, health providers, community organizers and advocates will discuss the evolution of LGBTQ health initiatives while underlining how this history can help inform today's resistance movements.

Photo credit: Bay Area Physicians for Human Rights, San Francisco Pride Parade. GLBT Historical Society, Amber Hollibaugh Collection, 1994.

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OurTownSF Nonprofit Expo 2018
Oct
20
12:30 PM12:30

OurTownSF Nonprofit Expo 2018

  • Eureka Valley Recreation Center (map)
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Location

Eureka Valley Recreation Center, 100 Collingwood St., San Francisco, CA 94114

Admission

Free

The GLBT Historical Society is participating in the Third Annual OurTownSF Nonprofit Expo, an annual resource fair of over 100 arts, community, fundraiser, health, legal, political, recovery, service & spiritual groups serving the LGBTQ community. For more information, click here.

Photo credit: OurTownSF

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“A Picture is a Word: The Posters of Rex Ray” Opening Reception
Oct
12
7:00 PM19:00

“A Picture is a Word: The Posters of Rex Ray” Opening Reception

Location
The GLBT Historical Society Museum
4127 18th St., San Francisco, CA 94114

Admission
$5.00 | Free for members

RSVP and purchase tickets here

A new exhibition at the GLBT Historical Society Museum surveys the graphic works of internationally renowned San Francisco queer artist and designer Rex Ray (1956 - 2015). "A Picture is a Word: The Posters of Rex Ray" features posters and book-cover designs reflecting the Bay Area music scene and LGBTQ publishing. Vibrant and subversively accessible, Ray's art effortlessly mixes high and low culture, beauty and post-modern conceptualism.

Curators Cydney Payton and Amy Scholder draw attention to Ray's signature graphics, first developed using a Mac Plus long before design applications changed the course of that art form. This distinctive digital style went on to influence the next generation of artists, clients in music and publishing, and their audiences. The opening reception will feature brief remarks by the curators. Light refreshments will be served.

Photo Credit: Rex Ray. Poster for David Bowie at the Warfield Theatre (1997). Rex Ray Graphic Art Collection, archives of the GLBT Historical Society; gift of the estate of Rex Ray.

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Fighting Back: Bringing LGBTQ History to California Classrooms
Sep
26
7:00 PM19:00

Fighting Back: Bringing LGBTQ History to California Classrooms

  • The GLBT Historical Society Museum (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Location

GLBT Historical Society Museum, 4127 18th. St., San Francisco, CA 94114

Admission

Free | $5.00 donation welcome 

RSVP and purchase tickets here

The latest in the GLBT Historical Society's monthly "Fighting Back" series exploring contemporary queer issues in a historical context, this community forum will offer a multigenerational conversation about about bringing LGBTQ history into classrooms for students from kindergarten through 12th grade in California public schools.

A panel of educators, historians, community organizers and school advocates will highlight resources and the latest educational initiatives, including implementation of the FAIR Education Act. The panel also will look at how these efforts can help inform today's resistance movements.

ABOUT THE PANELISTS:

Don Romesburg is Professor of Women's and Gender Studies at Sonoma State University. He is editor of the Routledge History of Queer America (2018) and has published scholarship with queer takes on public history as well as histories of adolescence, sex work, transracial adoption, family, and queer/trans performers. He was the lead scholar working to bring LGBT content into California's 2016 K-12 History-Social Science Framework and new textbooks. He now trains educators on implementation.

Carolyn Laub is a social entrepreneur, strategy consultant, and executive coach for non-profits and foundations focused on strategic communications, policy advocacy, growth and scaling, and fundraising. She is the founder and former executive director (1998-2014) of GSA Network, where she grew 40 GSA clubs in California to 940, trained youth advocates who helped pass 12 pieces of legislation, and scaled nationally thereby accelerating a movement of 4,000+ GSA clubs creating safer and more equitable schools today. While leading GSA Network, Carolyn spearheaded the community-driven effort to pass the FAIR Education Act in 2011, and since then served as the lead strategic consultant to the FAIR Education Act Implementation Coalition, helping win passage of the LGBT-inclusive California History-Social Science Framework and state-approved LGBT-inclusive instructional materials.

Dr. Rob Darrow is an educational consultant in LGBT history, safe and inclusive schools, curriculum development, college and career planning, and digital learning. He works as Director of Research and Professional Learning with the Safe School Project Santa Cruz County and recently taught the online course titled “LGBT History in Schools”. He has worked as an online school principal, adjunct professor, school librarian, and teacher in K-12 schools and has worked and consulted with people, schools, universities and organizations from pre-school to doctoral programs.

MODERATOR: Rick Oculto - Education Coordinator at Our Family Coalition where he collaborates with educators and school administrators to implement Welcoming Schools to create safe and LGBTQ-inclusive elementary schools. Formerly the Youth Service Coordinator at Billy DeFrank LGBT Center in San José, Rick developed programs that addressed LGBT youth issues and created the first transgender youth support group in the area.

This program is cosponsored by Our Family Coalition.

Photo credit: Members of the FAIR Education Act Coalition after testifying at the California Department of Education (August 2017). Photo courtesy Our Family Coalition.

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