Tagged History

Illustrated Talk: Missing Places — Lost & Endangered Queer Historic Sites of San Francisco and the Bay Area

The Embarcadero and the Produce District viewed from the Ferry Building in 1959. The area was home to a gay enclave from at least the 1930s until it was bulldozed for redevelopment in the early 1960s. Photo: San Francisco Public Library.
The Embarcadero and the Produce District viewed from the Ferry Building in 1959. The area was home to a gay enclave from at least the 1930s until it was bulldozed for redevelopment in the early 1960s. Photo: San Francisco Public Library.

Thursday, January 14, 7-9pm
at the GLBT History Museum
4127 18th St., SF.
$5 suggested donation

From the Sharp Park district of Pacifica to San Francisco’s Embarcadero (an area not often remembered as a gay enclave), you’ll encounter unexpectedly queer places in this lively illustrated talk. You’ll meet some fascinating people, too, including a woman tavern owner who fought the revocation of her liquor license all the way to the California Supreme Court — plus cameo appearances by female impersonator Ray Bourbon (1892–1971), famed sex researcher Alfred Kinsey (1894–1956), and chanteuses Bambi Lake and Justin Vivian Bond.

ABOUT THE EVENT
Drawing on examples from San Francisco and the Bay Area from the 1930s to the today, presenter Gerard Koskovich looks at processes that have led to the loss of GLBT historic sites and to their absence from public memory. He’ll also discuss ways to commemorate the stories of these missing places and will highlight forces currently threatening sites that embody the city’s GLBT history. Koskovich presented the talk to an enthusiastic audience at the University of London in November. The GLBT History Museum presentation marks its U.S. debut.

Cosponsored by San Francisco Heritage and Shaping San Francisco. Follow the conversation for this event on Facebook.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Gerard Koskovich is a San Francisco–based historian, curator and rare book dealer. A founding member of the GLBT Historical Society, he has published widely on GLBT history and culture and has given talks at universities, conferences and community organizations in the United States, England, France and Germany. He served as an advisory committee member for the recently adopted San Francisco LGBTQ Historic Context Statement and is one of 15 historians invited to advise the National Park Service on the launch of its LGBTQ Heritage Initiative.

EVENT DETAILS
“Missing Places: Lost & Endangered Queer
Historic Sites of San Francisco & the Bay Area”
Thursday, January 14, 7–9pm
The GLBT History Museum
4127 18th St., San Francisco
Admission: $5