News and Events

For Immediate Release
February 16, 2007

Contact: Don Romesburg, 415.850.8580


“WHAT MAKES NEIGHBORHOODS QUEER?”

Third Roundtable in Popular Series
“Queer in the City: GLBT Neighborhoods and Urban Planning”
Co-Sponsored by GLBT Historical Society and Castro Coalition 

SAN FRANCISCO —On Tuesday, February 27, from 6 to 8 p.m., the GLBT Historical Society in San Francisco will host “What Makes a Neighborhood Queer?” The round­table will explore the contested, multifaceted elements that create gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender neighborhoods—and will look at the sheer diversity of queer neigh­borhoods. The event is cosponsored by the Castro Coalition.

Internationally acclaimed scholars, local community activists and emerging intellectuals will discuss the political, cultural and economic phenomena that make neighborhoods queer—and will assess how those elements have changed over time. The roundtable also will explore how various people within the queer community have supported or clashed with one another in trying to build their own visions of neighborhood in lived urban space. The panel will feature several noted thinkers and advocates:

  • Dawn Philips, an East Bay activist for people of color and housing rights who helped lead a fight against gay gentrification in Oakland .
  • Don Reuter, an independent scholar developing a book on the rise and im­per­ilment of U.S. gay neighborhoods.
  • Leading feminist scholar and University of Michigan anthropology professor Gayle Rubin discussing the South of Market area as an alternate view of queer neighborhood.
  • University of Chicago doctoral candidate Tim Stewart-Winter describing the historical transformation of the Castro and the GLBT community.

The panel is the third in a groundbreaking series, “Queer in the City: GLBT Neigh­borhoods and Urban Planning,” which will run through March at the GLBT Historical Society. Previous standing-room-only panels in the series have included “Are Gay Neighborhoods Worth Saving?” and “What Do Queer Neighborhoods Do for Cities?” The March roundtable, still being finalized, will be entitled “Queer Neigh­bor­hoods of the Future.”

The series takes place amidst an upsurge of dialogue about the potentially imperiled future of the Castro as a GLBT neighborhood and as a global destination. Major rede­velop­ment plans may profoundly alter the Castro’s demography and cultural landscape in ways that could benefit the GLBT community—or potentially threaten it. Series co­spon­sor the Castro Coalition has formed to ensure that GLBT neighborhood issues are given a priority in com­munity planning efforts in the Castro neighborhood.

WHAT:  "What Makes Neighborhoods Queer?” roundtable discussion. Free and open to the public; refreshments provided.

WHEN:  Tuesday, February 27, 2007; 6-8 p.m.

WHERE: GLBT Historical Society, 657 Mission Street, Suite 300 (btwn. New Montgomery/Third), San Francisco . One block from the Montgomery BART/MUNI station. Inexpensive city parking nearby on Third (btwn. Folsom/Howard).

The mission of the GLBT Historical Society is to increase public understanding, appreciation, and affirmation of the history and culture of gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and other sexual minority individuals and communities. For more information, call 415.777.5455 or visit www.glbthistory.org.