From Museum events

Author Talk: Sex, Science, Self

glbtsexscienceself Thursday, October 20
7pm-9pm
The GLBT History Museum
4127 18th St., San Francisco
$5, free for members

Facebook invite here

Author Bob Ostertag will discuss his new book, “Sex Science Self: A Social History of Estrogen, Testosterone and Identity” (2016), in conversation with Trystan Cotten, an associate professor of gender studies at California State University, Stanislaus.

The book surveys the fascinating cultural and biological history of sex-hormone research. Ostertag situates this story in the context of an increasingly visible and political lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender population, and opens up a wealth of new questions and debates over gender, sexuality and medical treatments.

Ostertag is professor of cinema and digital media at the University of California, Davis is the author of five books and is an internationally known composer, performer and activist.

Teaching LGBTQ History to Kids: California’s New Framework

High school students learn about the queer past during a guided tour at the GLBT History. The group portrayed came from gay-straight alliances at high schools in San Joaquin County in California's Central Valley. They visited the museum on Feb. 20, 2016. Docent Bill Lipsky led the tour.
High school students learn about the queer past during a guided tour at the GLBT History. The group portrayed came from gay-straight alliances at high schools in San Joaquin County in California’s Central Valley. They visited the museum on Feb. 20, 2016. Docent Bill Lipsky led the tour.

 Thursday, October 13
7pm-9pm
The GLBT History Museum
1427 18th St., San Francisco
$5.00; free for members

In July 2016, the California Department of Education adopted a new educational framework that incorporates LGBTQ history into eight grades in elementary and high schools, making it by far the most LGBTQ-inclusive public school program in the nation.

In this presentation, Don Romesburg, chair of women’s and gender studies at Sonoma State University and program curator for the GLBT Historical Society, will describe the hard-fought campaign that resulted in adoption of the curriculum. He’ll also offer examples of the new course content for grades ranging from 2 through 11 and discuss the impact of this groundbreaking educational reform for students in California and beyond.

Romesburg was one of the editors of a report from the Comittee on LGBT History of the American Historical Association that made detailed recommendations for incorporating LGBTQ history in California’s K-12 teaching framework and was one of the leaders of the effort to persuade the state to adopt the recommendations.

Queer Trailblazer: Magnus Hirschfeld’s Life & Legacy

Tomb of Dr. Magnus Hirschfeld, Caucade Cemetery, Nice, France.
Tomb of Dr. Magnus Hirschfeld, Caucade Cemetery, Nice, France.

Thursday, October 6
7pm-9pm
The GLBT History Museum
4127 18th St., San Francisco
$5.00; free for members

Starting in the late 1890s, Dr. Magnus Hirschfeld (1868-1935) was a trailblazing defender of homosexual and transgender people in Germany and beyond. In conjunction with the GLBT History Museum’s current exhibition about Hirschfeld, a panel of distinguished historians will discuss his life and legacy:

• Mel Gordon, author of “Voluptuous Panic: The Erotic World of Weimar Berlin” (2008), will place Hirschfeld’s work in the context of German sexual culture of the 1920s.

• Gayle Rubin, professor of anthropology and women’s studies at the University of Michgan, Ann Arbor, and author of “Deviations: A Gayle Rubin Reader” (2011), will trace Hirschfeld’s influence as a sexologist.

• Gerard Koskovich, curator of the exhibition “Through Knowledge to Justice: The Sexual World of Dr. Magnus Hirschfeld,” will introduce and moderate the panel and will over a brief overview of Hirschfeld’s work and his 1931 visit to San Francisco.

 

Race, Gender & Sexuality in the Story of Kitty Genovese

glbtkitty Tuesday, October 4 7pm-9pm
The GLBT History Museum
4127 18th St., San Francisco
$5.00; free for members
Facebook invite here

Many know the story of Kitty Genovese, whose 1964 rape and murder in New York City with numerous bystanders who supposedly ignored the crime became a case study of big-city indifference.

Drawing on her new book, “No One Helped’: Kitty Genovese, New York City and the Myth of Urban Apathy (Cornell University Press, 2015), Marcia Gallo will detail little-known aspects of Genovese’s life, including her lesbian relationship, and will explore how New York’s shifting racial and economic demographics shaped the media’s “urban apathy” story.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Marcia Gallo is an associate professor of history at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, where she teaches courses on race, gender and sexuality, as well as oral history and public history.

Mighty Reels: ‘A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood’

The Castro Street Fair in the 1970s. Photo: Courtesy Castro Street Fair
The Castro Street Fair in the 1970s. Photo: Courtesy Castro Street Fair

Friday, September 30
7pm-8:30pm, $5
GLBT History Museum
4127 18th St., San Francisco
Facebook invite here.

This month’s installment of the Mighty Reels series of historic LGBTQ film and video from the archives of the GLBT Historical Society reveals the sights and sounds of the early years of the Castro Street Fair. Media preservationist John Raines presents rare videotape of the 1976 and 1978 fairs as captured by the Queer Blue Light media collective.

Always held on the first Sunday in October, the fair has been a favorite with residents and visitors alike for over 40 years. A major highlight of these videos is a brief interview with Harvey Milk, who explains his rationale for establishing the event in 1974. The screening takes place just two days before this year’s fair.

After Hours Party: Leather and Fur

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Rainbow Motorcycle Club (RMC) celebrating their 20th anniversary on April 12, 1992 on the back patio of the Lone Star Saloon. Photo: Mr. Marcus (collection of BEAR Cultural and Historical Archives).

Friday, September 23
7pm-9pm, $10
GLBT Museum
4127 18th St., SF
Advance tickets here.
Facebook invite here.

Our monthly After Hours party at the GLBT History Museum celebrates the queer past with dancing, drinks, nibbles and mingling in the galleries after the museum’s regular exhibition hours. This month’s theme, Leather and Fur, will bring together the leather and bear communities, with funds raised at the party supporting the GLBT History Museum’s upcoming exhibition on bear culture and bear cartoonist — beartoonist! — Fran Frisch.

The amazing drag king Alex U. Inn will be hosting, and special guest DJ Gayle Rubin, preeminent queer theorist and historian of the leather scene, will spin tunes from the golden age of the baths, sex clubs, and dungeons of San Francisco.

Event co-sponsored by Bears of San Francisco (BOSF).  Drinks sponsored by 440 Castro and raffle prizes donated by artist Fran Frisch.”

RHINO IN THE CASTRO: Whale Riding Weather

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Playwright Bryden MacDonald

Tuesday, September 6 from 7 to 9 p.m.
Museum

Theatre Rhinoceros and the GLBT Historical Society present Rhino in the Castro, a series of play readings that reflect the LGBTQ community and our allies. The museum provides the space, and Rhino provides the scripts and actors. This month’s offering, Whale Riding Weather by Bryden MacDonald, is a Pinteresque play about three men in an apartment: an older man, a young kept boy and another young man who wants to get the boy out. It’s a suffocating tale of dysfunctional relationships that offers a tantalizing look at North American queer drama of late the 1980s and early 1990s. Admission: free; donation welcome.

AFTER HOURS: Noche de Ambiente

ahnda_banFriday, August 26 from 7 to 9 p.m.
Museum
TICKETS

This month’s party at the GLBT History Museum features drinks, nibbles and dancing to Latin beats by DJ Dreams. Your drag diva party hostess: the fabulous Dulce De Leche!

The event will raise funds to support “Noche de Ambiente,” our upcoming exhibition celebrating iconic San Francisco Latinx drag performers and activists of the 1970s–1990s.

The After Hours party gives you a chance to don your club looks — or your over-the-top drag — for an evening of keeping the party going just like the queens and militants who stood up for the rights and the saftey of San Francisco’s Latinx LGBTQ community in decades past. Admission: $10-20 (sliding scale). Buy tickets.

MIGHTY REELS: Happy Birthday Sylvester!

sylvester

Wednesday, August 31 from 7 to 8:30 p.m.

Museum

Travel back to 1985 in the August installment of our monthly “Mighty Reels” series of moving images from the archives. Media preservationist John Raines presents a scarce video of the first “40th” birthday celebration for iconic San Francisco disco diva Sylvester (1947-1988), with the star performing sentimental standards backed by a jazz band. The program will conclude with encore clips of Sylvester and other Megatone Records artists including Paul Parker, Jo-Lo, Billy Preston and Modern Rocketry. Sylvester James was born in Los Angeles on Sept. 6, 1947, so the program is taking place less than a week before what would have been his 69th birthday. Admission: $5; free for members.

The Golden Age of Physique Photography (1945-1969)

gaoppThursday, August 25 from 7 to 9 p.m.
Museum

Collector John Fagundes presents an illustrated talk on the great photographers of the physique tradition. Post-World War II America saw the rise of this genre of commercial homoerotic photography operating within, and often challenging, the rigid confines of censorship laws. Coexisting with the onset of the pre-Stonewall movement for homosexual rights, physique images confronted mainstream society’s restrictions on photographs reflecting gay male desire. Fagundes will focus on the work of Douglas of Detroit, Bruce of Los Angeles, Bob Mizer (Athletic Model Guild) and Jim French (Colt Studios) as well as their predecessors who established a new aesthetic of the male nude with a particular appeal for gay men. Admission $5; free for members.

Dr. Magnus Hirschfeld exhibition opening reception

mhbooksFriday, August 19 from 7 to 9 p.m.
Museum

Through Knowledge to Justice: The Sexual World of Dr. Magnus Hirschfeld (1868-1935) offers an introduction to the German physician’s life, work and legacy through first editions, vintage periodicals and ephemera largely drawn from the collection assembled by curator Gerard Koskovich over the past three decades. In addition, the exhibition will include historic film documenting Hirschfeld’s impact and the fate of his work.

“Although the Nazi regime did its best to erase the memory of Hirschfeld and his contributions, it didn’t succeed. We remember Hirschfeld today not only because he helped found the movement to defend LGBTQ people more than a century ago, but also because his work as a sexologist was prescient,” Koskovich said. “With its emphasis on ‘sexual intermediacy,’ Hirschfeld’s thinking prefigures contemporary ideas about the continuum of sexual orientation, genderqueer expression and sexual fluidity.”

Join us for a reception to celebrate the opening of this unique exhibition which runs through November 23. Admission: $5.

COMPTON’S RIOT: Art launch and artist talk

crmugTuesday, August 16 from 7 to 9 p.m.
Museum

Don’t miss this launch party for Compton’s 50th Anniversary, featuring works by ceramic artist Nicki Green and interdisciplinary artist Chris Vargas commissioned by the GLBT Historical Society. Green is producing a limited-edition signature coffee mug referencing both Compton’s Cafeteria and the riot itself, while Vargas is hand-screening a numbered set of commemorative t-shirts from his own design. In conversation, the artists will discuss their creative processes and the relationship between trans history and art. Both works will be available for a limited time exclusively at the GLBT History Museum and the Tenderloin Museum.

Green is a trans-disciplinary artist whose work focuses on craft processes that document history and create legacy for marginalized communities. She has exhibited her work nationally, notably at the Leslie-Lohman Museum in New York City and the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco. Vargas is an artist whose work deploys humor and performance in conjunction with mainstream idioms to explore the complex ways that queer and trans people negotiate spaces for themselves within historical and institutional memory and popular culture. Vargas also serves as executive director of MOTHA: The Museum of Transgender Hirstory and Art. Admission: $5; free for members.

Remaining programs in the series
Thursday, August 18
7 p.m.
Roxie Theater Screaming Queens: The Riot at Compton’s Cafeteria
Thursday, September 1
7 p.m.
GLBT History Museum Sex Work in the Tenderloin Then and Now Cancelled
Thursday, September 8
8 p.m.
Tenderloin Museum Vanguard Revisited with Rev. Megan Rohrer

COMPTON’S RIOT: Cruising the Tenderloin in the 1960s

Thursday, August 4 from 7 to 9 p.m.
Museum

poz_100_15_felicia_elizondo[1]Felicia Elizondo, a self-described “Mexican spitfire, screaming queen, pioneer, legend, icon, diva, 29-year survivor of AIDS and Vietnam veteran” was one of the transgender participants in the 1966 Compton’s Cafeteria Riot. In 2015, she was named Lifetime Achievement Grand Marshal of the San Francisco Pride Parade. In this special multimedia presentation, she explores San Francisco’s Tenderloin District in the 1960s to explain how the Compton’s Cafeteria Riot was a defining moment in the struggle by a diverse gay and trans community to claim public lives and become who they were meant to be, paving the way for future generations. Admission: $5; free for members.

Remaining programs in the series
Tuesday, August 16
7 p.m.
GLBT History Museum Compton’s 50th Anniversary Art Launch and Artist Talk
Thursday, August 18
7 p.m.
Roxie Theater Screaming Queens: The Riot at Compton’s Cafeteria
Thursday, September 1
7 p.m.
GLBT History Museum Sex Work in the Tenderloin Then and Now Cancelled
Thursday, September 8
8 p.m.
Tenderloin Museum Vanguard Revisited with Rev. Megan Rohrer

RHINO IN THE CASTRO: The Bat

Monday, August 1 from 7 to 9 p.m.
Museum

Albert Rubio as Dale Ogden, Jean Wilcox as Miss Cornelia Van Gorder and Alan Littlehale as Brooks.
Albert Rubio as Dale Ogden, Jean Wilcox as Miss Cornelia Van Gorder and Alan Littlehale as Brooks.

Theatre Rhinoceros, San Francisco’s groundbreaking queer stage company, has teamed up with the GLBT History Museum to present Rhino in the Castro, a series of readings of plays reflecting the LGBTQ community and its allies. The museum provides the space, and Rhino provides the scripts and actors. Performances take place the first Monday of every month.

The second reading in the series is The Bat by Avery Hopwood and Mary Roberts Reinhart. This murder mystery from the 1920s was one of Hopwood’s most popular plays. The most successful American playwright of his time, Hopwood also was gay — but his writing did not deal directly with the topic. The Rhino has engaged Hopwood scholar Jack Sharrar to direct this reading of The Bat, and he’s making gender alterations to the characters to showcase the gay subtext and to reclaim the play for queer history and culture. Admission: free; $5 donation welcomed.

Stroke exhibition gallery tour

Friday, July 22 from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.
Museum

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Kent. “The Mechanic” (1992); acrylic and pencil on illustration board.

Join curator Robert Richards and Leslie-Lohman Museum Director Hunter O’Hanian for a lively talk exploring our new Front Gallery exhibition Stroke: From Under the Mattress to the Museum Walls. This showing of 1950s–1990s erotic art comprises twenty-four original illustrations, most drawn from the Leslie-Lohman Museum’s vast collection. Other pieces have been borrowed from private collectors and in some cases from the individual artists. Included in the exhibition will be artwork by Neel Bate (Blade), Michael Breyette, Michael Broderick, Harry Bush, Jim French (Colt), Oliver Frey, Kevin King (BEAU), Michael Kirwan, Touko Laaksonen (Tom of Finland), Antonio Lopez (Antonio), David Martin, Donald Merrick (Domino), Kent Neffendorf (Kent), Olaf Odegaard (Olaf), Mel Odom, Dominic Orejudos (Etienne), Benoît Prévot, George Stavrinos, Rex, Robert W. Richards, Richard Rosenfeld, William Schmelling (Hun), George Quaintance and Frank Webber (Bastille). Admission: $5.00; free for members.

MIGHTY REELS: That’s MS. Leather to You!

Friday, July 29 from 7 to 8:30 p.m.
Museum

MS1987-1

Kick off your Up Your Alley festival weekend with our screening of the first-ever International Ms. Leather competition of 1987. Media preservationist John Raines presents an hour-long video highlighting the excitement, thrills, and laughs of this playful romp held at San Francisco’s long-vanished DV8 Lounge. Since its inception in 1987, International Ms. Leather has become a fixture in the leather and lesbian communities and an annual sibling to Chicago’s International Mr. Leather contest.

ONLINE_Sampler_35_15_LRG[1]Our special guest is Audrey Joseph, a longtime entertainment producer and LGBT rights activist who was closely involved with this inaugural event. Admission: $5; free for members.

Stroke exhibition opening reception

stroke2
David Martin. “Boxer” (1980); graphite on paper.

Thursday, July 21 from 7 to 9 p.m.
Museum

Join us for the opening of Stroke: From Under the Mattress to the Museum Walls, a historical retrospective of erotic illustrations from gay men’s magazines from the 1950s to the 1990s. Curated by artist Robert W. Richards, this exhibition of a largely forgotten body of work not only explores the male form, but also offers an examination of erotic fantasies as experienced through publications that were available at nearly every newsstand in America, but that men often hid under their mattresses for fear of being discovered. This showing of 24 authentic illustrations originated at the Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art in New York City. Our San Francisco presentation, its only scheduled appearance on the West Coast, will be on display through mid-October. Admission: $5; free to members.

AFTER HOURS: Decades of Dive Bars

Friday, July 22 from 7 to 9 p.m.
Museum
Advance tickets


Our new monthly party celebrates queer history with dancing and mingling in the galleries after the museum’s regular exhibition hours. This month’s theme is “Decades of Dive Bars” hosted by reigning Grand Duchess Olivia Hart, star of James Hosking’s 2015 documentary, Beautiful By Night: a Tribute to Aunt Charlie’s. Also DJ Bus Station John, drinks and nibbles. Wine and beer sponsor: Virgil’s Sea Room. Admission: $10.

Philadelphia Freedom: Gay Patriots, Protesters & Profiteers at the Bicentennial

Thursday, July 7 from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Museum

philadelphia
Marc Stein and Philadelphia’s Independence Hall

Historian Marc Stein queers Independence Day by examining the U.S. Bicentennial in 1976, when disaster resulted from the strange political courtship that had linked Republican President Richard Nixon and Democratic Philadelphia Mayor Frank Rizzo; the gay porn magazine Mandate published a fashion spread titled “Philadelphia Freedom”; and LGBTQ patriots, protesters and profiteers marked the national birthday. A professor of history at San Francisco State and author of three books including City of Sisterly and Brotherly Loves: Lesbian and Gay Philadelphia, 1945-1972  (University of Chicago Press, 2000), Stein reveals the cultural and political significance of a nearly forgotten moment of the 1970s when LGBTQ people claimed a place in a national spectacle. Admission: $5.00; free for members of the GLBT Historical Society.

RHINO IN THE CASTRO: Swollen Tongues

Tuesday, July 5 from 7 to 9 p.m.
Museum

Theatre Rhinoceros, San Francisco’s groundbreaking LGBTQ stage company, teams up with the GLBT Historical Society to present Rhino in the Castro, a monthly series of play readings reflecting the LGBTQ community and its allies. The museum provides the space, and Rhino provides the scripts and actors. Performances will take place the first week of every month.

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Playwright Kathleen Oliver
The first staged reading features Swollen Tongues by Kathleen Oliver. Written in rhyming couplets, the play is a take on Restoration comedy with a contemporary twist. Thomas and his sister Catherine are both receiving instruction in the powers of poetry from their tutor, Dr. Wise. While Thomas is more prolific than skilled in his praise of his beloved, Sonja, Catherine is strangely mute. The problem? Catherine is secretly in love with Sonja, too. Admission: free; $5 donation encouraged.