From Museum events

Reel in the Closet: Showing With the Filmmakers

Reel in the Closet: Showing With the Filmmakers
Thursday, August 31
7:00 PM
Roxie Theater
3117 16th St., San Francisco
$15.00 | $12.50 for members


Home movies in the GLBT Historical Society Archives. Photo: Stu Maddux

 

This special showing of Reel in the Closet will benefit preservation of the film and video collections of the GLBT Historical Society. The feature-length documentary reveals LGBTQ life through rarely seen home movies dating back to the 1930s, drawing on extensive footage from the Historical Society and from other archives around the world.

The screening will offer a new cut of Reel in the Closet with added historical material providing glimpses of 20th-century life as it was experienced, viewed and recorded by members of the

LGBTQ community. Filmmakers Stu Maddux and Joseph Applebaum will be on hand to introduce the film and respond to question, plus they’ll show a bonus episode of their new web series, Queer Ghost Hunters.

Activist Marsha P. Johnson as seen in a 1972 home movie.

General admission is $15. Admission for GLBT Historical Society members is $12.50. Advance tickets are available for purchase online via the Roxie Theater website.

Picturing Kinship: A Tour by the Artist

Picturing Kinship: A Tour by The Artist
Monday, September 18
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
The GLBT History Museum
4127 18th St., San Francisco
Admission: $5.00 | Free for members  


Veuxdo in the Fillmore (2012); acrylic on canvas. Copyright © Lenore Chinn; used with permission

For the closing night of “Picturing Kinship: Portraits of Our Community by Lenore Chinn,” the painter and photographer herself will offer an informal tour of the exhibition. Chinn will share stories about the portraits and their subjects and about the processes and politics of her work during 35 years of depicting San Francisco’s LGBTQ community.

The subjects of the portraits are individuals who have contributed to the diversity of San Francisco’s cultural landscape in such fields as poetry, visual and performing arts, film, rock music, academia, and the LGBTQ movement. The exhibition is curated by Tirza True Latimer, chair of the graduate program in visual and critical studies at the California College of the Arts in San Francisco.

Queer Before the Theory: Gavin Arthur & the Circles of Sex

Queer Before the Theory: Gavin Arthur & the Circles of Sex 
Thursday, September 14
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
The GLBT History Museum
4127 18th St., San Francisco
Admission: $5.00 | Free for members


Gavin Arthur from the dust jacket of his book The Circle of Sex (1966). Collection of Gerard Koskovich

In conjunction with the exhibition “Lavender-Tinted Glasses: A Groovy Gay Look at the Summer of Love” at the GLBT History Museum, curator Joey Cain will present the astounding story of a bisexual adventurer, utopian, philosopher and astrologer Gavin Arthur (1901­-1972).

The grandson of U.S. president Chester A. Arthur and the son of a mining millionaire, Gavin Arthur fled his privileged upbringing in the 1920s to take up outsider causes and bohemian pursuits. He frequented early 20th-century homosexual emancipationists, Irish liberation fighters, and avant-garde culture-makers, ending his days in San Francisco as a philosophical grandfather of the hippies.

Arthur laid out his radical theory of the fluidity of sexual orientation in his book The Circle of Sex, first published in 1964 and released in a much-expanded edition in 1966.

Among the Bohemians: Yone Noguchi & Charles Warren Stoddard

Among the Bohemians: Yone Noguchi & Charles Warren Stoddard
Wednesday, September 6
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
The GLBT History Museum
4127 18th St., San Francisco
Admission: $5.00  |  Free for members


Yone Noguchi portrait inscribed to Charles Warren Stoddard (1903). Courtesy Huntington Library, San Marino, Calif.

“Faces From the Past” is a new display in the “Queer Past Becomes Present” exhibition at the GLBT History Museum. It uses tintypes, postcards, newspaper articles, paintings, mug shots, arrest records and other historical documents to present more than 150 years of queer presence in Northern California.

In conjunction with the exhibit, historian Amy Sueyoshi will trace the affairs of Japanese immigrant poet Yone Noguchi, San Francisco author Charles Warren Stoddard and their bohemian circle at the turn of the 20th century. Her talk will examine how same-sex sexuality, marital infidelity and interracial love could exist openly in the United States in an era when the law criminalized sodomy and miscegenation.

Sueyoshi is associate dean of the College of Ethnic Studies at San Francisco State and is the author Queer Compulsions: Race, Nation, and Sexuality in the Affairs of Yone Noguchi (Univesity of Hawaii Press, 2012).

Queer Heritage Mixer at the Historic Gangway

Queer Heritage Mixer at the Historic Gangway
Wednesday, August 16
5:30 – 7:30 PM
The Gangway
841 Larkin St., San Francisco
Free (ages 21-plus)


The Gangway (circa 1973); photo by Henri Leleu from the archives of the GLBT Historical Society.

The GLBT Historical Society’s Historic Places Working Group is hosting its inaugural happy hour at the half-century-old Gangway bar in the Polk. Drop in to meet other queer preservation enthusiasts and join a lively discussion about preserving San Francisco’s beloved LGBTQ historic places.

Our working group aims to document, preserve and interpret LGBTQ historic sites in the Bay Area. The group is composed of preservationists, historians, planners and community members with a keen interest in places that tell the stories of LGBTQ history.

To join or for more information on the happy hour, contact working group chair Shayne Watson at moc.o1516101303ohay@1516101303ph_qt1516101303bgl_f1516101303s1516101303. Join the Facebook conversation here.

LGBTQ Portraits: A Queer Historical Perspective

LGBTQ Portraits: A Queer Historical Perspective
Thursday, August 10
7:00 – 9:00 PM
The GLBT History Museum
4127 18th St., San Francisco
Admission $5.00 | Free for members  


Four noted art specialists will discuss how LGBTQ artists and sitters have queered the conventions of the portrait. Why does portraiture — deeply implicated from its inception in the representation of kinship, affiliation, and identity — remain important to queer communities in the so-called post-identity era?

The panel will feature Tirza Latimer, chair of the Graduate Program in Visual and Critical Studies at the California College of the ArtsPamela Peniston, director of the Queer Cultural CenterRudy Lemcke, visual artist, and curator; and artist Lenore Chinn, whose painted and photographic queer portraits are currently on display in “Picturing Kinship: Portraits of Our Community by Lenore Chinn” at the GLBT History Museum. Join the Facebook conversation here.

LGBTQ Portraits: A Queer Historical Perspective

LGBTQ Portraits: A Queer Historical Perspective
Thursday, August 10
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
The GLBT History Museum
4127 18th St., San Francisco
Admission: $5.00  |  Free for members


Butler’s View (1993); acrylic on canvas. Self-portrait by Lenore Chinn. Copyright © Lenore Chinn.

Four noted art specialists will discuss how LGBTQ artists and sitters have queered the conventions of the portrait. Why does portraiture — deeply implicated from its inception in the representation of kinship, affiliation, and identity — remain important to queer communities in the so-called post-identity era?

The panel will feature Tirza Latimer, chair of the Graduate Program in Visual and Critical Studies at the California College of the Arts; Pam Peniston, director of the Queer Cultural Center; Rudy Lemcke, visual artist, and curator; and artist Lenore Chinn, whose painted and photographic queer portraits are currently on display in “Picturing Kinship: Portraits of Our Community by Lenore Chinn” at the GLBT History Museum.

Fighting Back: Gender Labels — Then & Now

Fighting Back: Gender Labels — Then & Now
Tuesday, August 22
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
The GLBT History Museum
4127 18th St., San Francisco
Admission: Free | $5.00 donation welcome


Transvestia magazine (October 1964), an early national journal for gender-variant individuals. Archives of the GLBT Historical Society.

The latest in the GLBT Historical Society’s monthly “Fighting Back” series exploring contemporary queer-community issues in a historical context, “Gender Labels: Then and Now” will offer a multigenerational conversation about the changing dynamics of gender labels within the LGBTQ community and among the general public.

A panel of historians, authors and activists will discuss the history of gender self-identification and gender-label assignment and will look at how this history can inform today’s evolving language for characterizing gender in the media, the workplace, social-justice movements and everyday conversation.

PANELISTS

Alecs (aka: Sailor) has been playing around with the significance of words and labels and their meanings in different marginalized communities, especially the trans community and gender and sexually nonconforming communities for many years. She is an avid writer, occasional workshop presenter, and committed volunteer who lives and plays in and around San Francisco.

Alexsarah “Golden” Collier is a media activist, musician and writer from the deep, black, magical South. Collier is executive director of Double Union, the nation’s largest feminist makerspace and community workshop, creator of the Womanist Trilliance on Soundcloud, and member of the Sula Collective and Sister Worldwide. Collier also is a teaching member of Girl Army, an Oakland collective providing strengths-based, sliding-scale self-defense for women, and gender nonconforming and trans folks.

Ola Osaze is a 2017 Soros Justice Fellow and a national organizer with LGBTQ Black Immigrant Justice, a project of the Transgender Law Center. He is a Nigerian immigrant with over 10 years’ experience in resource development, community organizing and program management, working for such organizations as the Opportunity Agenda, the Sylvia Rivera Law Project, Queers for Economic Justice and CAAAV Organizing Asian Communities. As a community activist, Osaze cofounded TransJustice at the Audre Lorde Project in New York City and was involved with Uhuru Wazobia, the first LGBTQ groups for African immigrants in New York.

Don Romesburg is professor of women’s and gender studies at Sonoma State University. He is editor of the Routledge History of Queer America (2018) and has published in numerous journals and anthologies with queer takes on public history as well as histories of adolescence, sex work, transracial adoption, family and queer/trans performers. He was the lead scholar working to bring LGBTQ content into California’s 2016 K-12 History-Social Science Framework. Romesburg is a cofounder of the GLBT History Museum.

Julia Serano is the author of three books, Whipping Girl: A Transsexual Woman on Sexism and the Scapegoating of Femininity (now in second edition); Excluded: Making Feminist and Queer Movements More Inclusive; and Outspoken: A Decade of Transgender Activism and Trans Feminism. Her writings have also appeared in numerous anthologies and media outlets, and have been used as teaching materials in queer and gender-studies courses across North America.

MODERATOR

Gina White has been taking a break from a decades-long software engineering career while she considers what she is going to do when she grows up. Most of her volunteer efforts go toward queer and women-focused nonprofits. She recently led a group of first-year law students on a visit to conduct legal interviews of trans women who were being held in a men’s state prison. She is extremely proud that these students considered this to be one of the most valuable experiences of their summer.

“Do What Thou Wilt”: Kenneth Anger & the Dawn of Aquarius

“Do What Thou Wilt”: Kenneth Anger & the Dawn of Aquarius
Thursday, August 17
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
The GLBT History Museum
4127 18th St., San Francisco
Admission: $5.00  |  Free for members


Screen capture from Kenneth Anger’s underground film Inauguration of the Pleasure Dome (1954).

Groundbreaking avant-garde gay film maker Kenneth Anger began expanding the possibilities of cinema in the late 1940s, and his visionary films had a decided influence on the participants in the Summer of Love. A foundational element of Anger’s poetics is the work of bisexual poet and ceremonial “magickian” Aleister Crowley.

In conjunction with “Lavender-Tinted Glasses: A Groovy Gay Look at the Summer of Love,” an exhibition currently on display at the GLBT History Museum, curator Joey Cain will present research into Crowley’s homosexuality, philosophy and system of magick along with excerpts from Anger’s films to elucidate themes in Anger’s ecstatic cinematic dreamscapes.

 

The Future of Leather: Where We Came From, Where We’re Going

The Future of Leather: Where We Came From, Where We’re Going 
Friday, July 28
7:00 – 10:00 p.m.
The GLBT History Museum
4127 18th St., San Francisco
Admission: $5.00 | Free for members

Bikers in leather in San Francisco’s South of Market neighborhood (circa 1985). Photo: Robert Pruzan; a collection of the GLBT Historical Society.

San Francisco has long been known for its groundbreaking LGBTQ leather and BDSM community. In conjunction with the new “South of Market: San Francisco’s Leather Scene” display in the “Queer Past Becomes Present” exhibition at the GLBT History Museum’s Main Gallery, curator Greg Pennington will facilitate a discussion about the leather scene from the 1960s to the present and beyond. Prominent leather community members, authors, and scholars will take part, including Gayle Rubin, Jordy Tackitt-Jones, Rajat Dutta and Race Bannon. A social hour with light refreshments will follow.

Faces From the Past: Queer Lives in Northern California Before 1930

Faces From the Past: Queer Lives in Northern California Before 1930
Friday, July 14
6:00 – 9:00 p.m.
The GLBT History Museum
4127 18th St., San Francisco
Admission: $5.00 | Free for members

Homer Baker, age 19; convicted of sodomy and sentenced to six years at San Quentin. Original file identification card, San Francisco Police Department (1908). Courtesy Bill Lipsky.

“Faces From the Past” is a new display in the “Queer Past Becomes Present” exhibition at the GLBT History Museum’s Main Gallery. Using tintypes, postcards, newspaper articles, paintings, mug shots, arrest records and other historic documents, curators Paula Lichtenberg and Bill Lipsky examine over 150 years of queer presence in Northern California.

In the first of a series of programs in conjunction with the display, this panel will feature the curators, along with two historians. Independent scholar Will Roscoe will discuss Queen Califia, the semi-mythical figure after whom California is named, and the two-spirits of the Bay Area. San Francisco State University Professor Clare Sears will speak on laws that criminalized cross-dressing and same-sex sexuality in 19th-century San Francisco.

A reception with the curators starts at 6 p.m., followed by the panel at 7 p.m

Inside Hollywood’s Bisexual Closet: Marilyn Monroe and More

Inside Hollywood’s Bisexual Closet: Marilyn Monroe and More  
Thursday, July 20
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
The GLBT History Museum
4127 18th St., San Francisco
Admission: $5.00 | Free for members


Front cover of Boze Hadleigh’s Marilyn Forever: Musings on an American Icon by Stars of Yesterday and Today (Taylor Trade Publishing, 2016)

A look at bisexuality behind the scenes in old Hollywood with Boze Hadleigh, the author of two books published last year that address the question: Hollywood Lesbians: From Garbo to Foster and Marilyn Forever: Musings on an American Icon by the Stars of Yesterday and Today. Rock Hudson once told Hadleigh, “I don’t believe in bisexuals,” yet Hadleigh thinks bisexual activity may have been prevalent in the studio system which showcased the beauty of both genders.

For a shot at stardom, he notes, many comely heterosexual men took a turn on the gay casting couch, while ambitious lipstick lesbians tolerated the straight version. Sometimes a basically gay star such as Cary Grant acted bi for career’s sake — and a sex symbol could question her sexuality while maintaining a straight image, as did Monroe.

Hadleigh will discuss these tales and more in his talk at the GLBT History Museum.

We Were Rebels: Jae Whitaker Remembers Janis Joplin

We Were Rebels: Jae Whitaker Remembers Janis Joplin
Thursday, July 6
7:00 – 10:00 p.m.
The GLBT History Museum
4127 18th St., San Francisco
Admission: $5.00  |  Free for members


Jae Whitaker at the opening of the “Lavender-Tinted Glasses” exhibition at the GLBT History Museum. Behind her at left: Portraits of Janis Joplin and Whitaker in the early 1960s. Photo: Gerard Koskovich

A conversation with Jae Whitaker, an African American lesbian musician who moved to San Francisco in the early 1960s to participate in the Beat scene that was centered in the city’s North Beach neighborhood. In 1963 she met the young Janis Joplin; the two became lovers and lived together.

Joey Cain, curator of our current exhibition “Lavender-Tinted Glasses: A Groovy Gay Look at the Summer of Love,” will interview Whitaker about her early life, the Beat scene, her meeting and relationship with Joplin, her experiences during the Summer of Love, and her life in San Francisco in the subsequent five decades.

 

Fighting Back: The Making of a Queer Museum

Fighting Back: The Making of a Queer Museum
Tuesday, July 25
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
The GLBT History Museum
4127 18th St., San Francisco
Admission: Free; $5.00 donation welcome

View through the front windows of the GLBT History Museum in San Francisco on the evening it opened for previews (December 10, 2010). Photo: Gerard Koskovich

The latest in the GLBT Historical Society’s monthly “Fighting Back” series exploring contemporary issues in a historical context, “The Making of a Queer Museum” will offer a multigenerational conversation about the role of museums in preserving and presenting the history and culture of marginalized communities.

Moderated by GLBT Historical Society Executive Director Terry Beswick, a panel of cultural activists, independent scholars and museum professionals will describe their involvement in establishing population-specific public history institutions in San Francisco and elsewhere:

The panelists’ remarks plus observations and comments from all who attend will contribute to San Francisco’s Citywide LGBTQ Cultural Heritage Strategy. For more information on the city initiative, visit the San Francisco Planning Department website.

San Francisco ACT UP Oral History Project

 

Sit-in by Stop AIDS Now or Else (SANOE) on the Golden Gate Bridge (1989). Left to right: Jade Travers (died 1994), Chaya Gordon, Henry Bortman, unidentified, Ric Puglia, Mic Sweeny, Rebecca Hensler, unidentified. Photo: Copyright © Rick Gerharter.

 

 

The GLBT Historical Society has launched a new wide-scale oral history project to chronicle, preserve and share the history of ACT UP/San Francisco and other AIDS direct-action groups in the city. ACT UP/San Francisco was a highly visible and influential group of militant AIDS activists associated with a national network of independent organizations that shared the name AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power.

ACT UP/San Francisco emerged from earlier AIDS direct-action efforts in the city starting in 1984; it remained active into the mid-1990s. The project will document this wider context by also gathering oral histories on AIDS direct action by other local groups, including Enola Gay, the ARC/AIDS Vigil, AIDS Action Pledge, ACT UP/Golden Gate and Prevention Point.

In addition to creating historical documentation, the project aims to foster dialogue between ACT UP veterans and younger organizers active in the current upwelling of social justice organizing. The initiative will train people ages 18–29 to conduct oral histories and to actively shape project outcomes. Through round-table conversations, listening parties and other public events, the project will draw on the history of AIDS direct action in San Francisco to inform contemporary resistance.

 

Project Objectives

The ACT UP/San Francisco Oral History Project will be active through 2019. The outcomes will include the following:

  • Oral histories with at least 40 former members of ACT UP/San Francisco to be permanently archived and maintained by the GLBT Historical Society.
  • An exhibition at the GLBT History Museum incorporating high-quality documentary-style video portraits, photos, and other materials.
  • A multimedia Internet presence.
  • A series of culminating public events offering opportunities for dialogue and debate

Through oral history recordings, the project will document ACT UP/San Francisco’s legacy of protest and politics. In addition, the project will focus on the unique artistic and sexual cultures fostered through the constellation of San Francisco groups of which it was a part, including AIDS Action Pledge; Mobilization Against AIDS; Stop AIDS Now or Else (SANOE); Queer Nation/San Francisco; Boy With Arms Akimbo/Girl With Arms Akimbo; Bad Cop/No Donut; Diseased Pariah News; and Transgender Nation.

 


 

Project Director

The project director is Joey Plaster, an oral historian and doctoral candidate in American Studies at Yale University. The recipient of the American Historical Society’s Allan Bérubé Prize for work in public history, he has designed projects that interpret oral histories in relation to neighborhood gentrification and conflict, engage queer homeless youth activists in documenting their community’s history, and analyze pre–gay liberation college life through interactive online platforms.

Contact

Interested in sharing your story or volunteering? Contact Joey Plaster at gro.y1516101303rotsi1516101303htblg1516101303@yeoj1516101303.

Join

To take part in the conversation and get regular updates, join the Facebook group: ACT UP/San Francisco Oral History Project.

Project Staff: GLBT Historical Society

  • Executive Director: Terry Beswick
  • Museum Working Group Chair: Elisabeth Cornu
  • Managing Archivist: Joanna Black

Project Advisors

  • Gerard Koskovich, a public historian formerly active in ACT UP/San Francisco, Queer Nation/San Francisco and Bad Cop/No Donut.
  • Marc Stein, professor of history at San Francisco State University
  • Amy Sueyoshi, Associate Dean of the College of Ethnic Studies at San Francisco State University
  • Laura Wexler, professor of American studies and women’s, gender and sexuality studies at Yale University

 

 

 

Funders

This project is made possible by support from California Humanities, a nonprofit partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the GLBT Historical Society.

 

STAGED READING Rhino in the Castro: In the Heart of America

  
Staged Reading
Rhino in the Castro: In the Heart of America
Monday, June 5
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
The GLBT History Museum
4127 18th St., San Francisco
Admission: Free; $5.00 Donation Welcome

Theatre Rhinoceros, San Francisco’s groundbreaking queer stage company, has teamed up with the GLBT History Museum to present “Rhino in the Castro,” a series of readings of plays reflecting the LGBTQ community and our allies. The museum provides the space, and Rhino provides the scripts and actors. This month’s offering is “In the Heart of America” by Naomi Wallace. During the First Gulf War, Craver, “white trash” from Tennessee, and Remiz, a Palestinian American, served together and fell in love. Later, Remzi’s sister wants to know what happened to her brother.

EXHIBITION OPENING Picturing Kinship: Portraits of Our Community

Exhibition Opening
Picturing Kinship: Portraits of Our Community  
Friday, June 9
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
The GLBT History Museum
4127 18th St., San Francisco
Admission: $5.00; Free for members

A new exhibition offering a 35-year overview of portraits in painting and photography by San Francisco artist Lenore Chinn. Her work depicts a wide spectrum of women and men, people of color and the LGBTQ community. The subjects are largely individuals who have contributed to San Francisco’s cultural landscape in fields ranging from poetry to visual and performing arts, film, rock music, academia and the LGBTQ movement. They have been pioneers in creating visibility for queer communities — and Lenore’s portraits of them constitute a reflection of LGBTQ experience that has been largely invisible in mainstream narratives of contemporary art. The opening will feature comments from the artist along with light refreshments. “Picturing Kinship” runs through September 18 at the GLBT History Museum.

AUTHOR TALK | Eccentric Modernisms: Making Differences in the History of American Art

Author Talk
Eccentric Modernisms: Making Differences in the History of American Art 

Monday, June 12
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
The GLBT History Museum
4127 18th St., San Francisco
Admission: $5.00; Free for members

Art historian Tirza True Latimer presents her new book, Eccentric Modernisms: Making Differences in the History of American Art (University of California Press), which traces the networks of cosmopolitan eccentrics who made space in America in the 1930s and 1940s for what we would today call queer culture. Latimer is an associate professor and chair of the Graduate Program in Visual and Critical Studies at the California College of the Arts, San Francisco. She will be interviewed by James Voorhies, dean of fine arts at California College of the Arts. Eccentric Modernisms focuses on gay men who formed Gertrude Stein’s circle of support, including painter Pavel Tchelitchew, composer Virgil Thompson and writer Charles Henri Ford. These artists and others collaborated in distinctively queer ways across national, cultural and disciplinary boundaries to form artistic and intellectual communities.

Picnic & Dance: Queer Summer of Love in Golden Gate Park

Picnic & Dance: Queer Summer of Love in Golden Gate Park

Sunday, June 18    
Noon to 5:00 PM 
National AIDS Memorial Grove  
Golden Gate Park 
Free. Donations Welcome.

 
Graphic from the San Francisco Oracle (April 1967). Courtesy Regent Press.

In conjunction with the “Lavender-Tinted Glasses” exhibition currently on display at the GLBT History Museum, the Calamus Fellowship invites you to join in an afternoon tribute to the queer movers and shakers who helped create the Summer of Love in 1967. The potluck picnic and dance for all ages will take place at the National AIDS Memorial Grove in Golden Gate Park. DJs Brontez Purnell, Malik Mays and others will provide the sounds. Fabulous tie-dye and other LGBTQ hippie looks encouraged. Free admission. Calamus will be collecting donations for the AIDS Memorial Grove and the GLBT Historical Society. To join the Facebook conversation, click here.

STAGED READING Rhino in the Castro: Blue Fire on the Water

  
Staged Reading
Rhino in the Castro: Blue Fire on the Water
Monday, May 1
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
The GLBT History Museum
4127 18th St., San Francisco
Admission: Free; $5.00 Donation Welcome

Photo: Dreamstime

Theatre Rhinoceros, San Francisco’s groundbreaking queer stage company, has teamed up with the GLBT History Museum to present “Rhino in the Castro,” a series of readings of plays reflecting the LGBTQ community and our allies. The museum provides the space, and Rhino provides the scripts and actors. This month’s offering is “Blue Fire on the Water: A Memory Play With Music” by Renita Martin. There’s Jo, in his 80s, teaching Maybelle, a young woman with natural talent, to sing the blues. Maybelle loves Jo, but Jo has secrets. Meanwhile, it’s New Orleans, and the water is rising.