From Museum events

Rhino in the Castro: “She Kills Monsters” by Qui Nguyen

STAGED READING   
Rhino in the Castro: “She Kills Monsters” by Qui Nguyen
Monday, February 6
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
The GLBT History Museum
Admission: Free; $5.00 donation welcome
– – – – –
Playwright Qui Nguyen. Photo: Mark Dawson

Theatre Rhinoceros, San Francisco’s groundbreaking queer stage company, has teamed up with the GLBT History Museum to present “Rhino in the Castro,” a series of readings of plays reflecting the LGBTQ community and our allies. The museum provides the space, and Rhino provides the scripts and actors.

This month’s offering is “She Kills Monsters,” a drama by Qui Nguyen. Agnes regrets that she never got to know her teenage sister, Tilly, who was killed in a car accident. But when Agnes ventures into Tilly’s world of Dungeons and Dragons, she discovers a Tilly she didn’t know existed, along with Tilly’s girlfriend, a few enemies and some unfinished business.

Bearing Witness: Remembering International Bear Rendezvous

LIVING HISTORY
Bearing Witness: Remembering International Bear Rendezvous  
Thursday, February 16
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
The GLBT History Museum
Admission: $5.00; free for members
– – – – –
Winners of the 2006 International Mr. Bear competition. Photograph by Ted Buel; used with permission from Bears of San Francisco (BOSF).

From 1995 to 2011, the Bears of San Francisco produced International Bear Rendezvous (IBR), an annual gathering that celebrated older, larger, hairier, ruggedly masculine gay men who had been largely excluded from standards of attractiveness in gay popular culture. Guests arrived from throughout the U.S. and beyond for a Presidents Day weekend of fun, fundraising and friendship, culminating in the International Mr. Bear competition on Sunday evening. In its 17 years, IBR raised more $500,000 for LGBTQ charities. For this living history panel, organizers and participants will come together for an evening of laughter, insight and remembering about this foundational event for the bear community.

Gay Men & Lesbians: We Still Like Each Other, Right?

COMMUNITY FORUM 
Gay Men & Lesbians: We Still Like Each Other, Right?  

Wednesday, February 22
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
The GLBT History Museum
Admission: Free
– – – – –
Lesbians and gay men joining together to demand equal rights at the National March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights, Washington, D.C. (October 11, 1987). Photo courtesy Brian Thorstenson.

Queer theater artists Tracy Ward, Brian Thorstenson and Patricia Cotter are developing a stage work about the connections between lesbians and gay men. As part of their research, they’re hosting this open forum to explore how men and women in the queer community have formed friendships, chosen family, collaboration in work and activism, and other kinds of relationships. When the country seems more divided than ever, the gathering will involve an open, honest and fun discussion of divisions and connections within the community. Some of the stories might even find their way on to the stage. All ages, opinions and genders are welcome.

Lavender & Red: Liberation and Solidarity in the Gay and Lesbian Left

AUTHOR TALK
Lavender & Red: Liberation and Solidarity in the Gay and Lesbian Left

Monday, February 27
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
The GLBT History Museum
Admission: $5.00; Free for Members
– – – – –
Emily Hobson, author of Lavender and Red. Photo courtesy of the author.
Front cover of Lavender and Red by Emily K. Hobson.
 Emily Hobson will discuss her new book,  Lavender and Red: Liberation and Solidarity in the Gay and Lesbian Left  (University of California Press, 2016), a history of queer radicalism in the San Francisco Bay Area from the late 1960s through the Reagan-Bush years. Drawing on extensive research at the GLBT Historical Society, Hobson shows how gay and lesbian leftists defined sexual liberation through solidarity against racism, imperialism and war. Her use of archives, oral histories and images
rediscovers the radical queer past for a generation of activists today. Hobson serves as assistant professor of history and gender, race and identity at the University of Nevada, Reno.

Voices of the Past: Capturing LGBTQ Oral Histories

Wednesday, February 1    
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
The GLBT History Museum
4127 18th St., San Francisco
Admission: Free 

The GLBT Historical Society is relaunching its “Oral History Project,” an initiative to record interviews with community elders who’ll share their recollections of the LGBTQ past. Such interviews often provide the only record of aspects of everyday life in decades gone by, particularly for LGBTQ people from underrepresented groups. The project will offer numerous volunteer opportunities, from conducting interviews and researching background histories to providing technical assistance or offering general support. This volunteer-orientation evening will provide all the details you’ll need to get involved.