By GLBT Historical Society

The Golden Age of Physique Photography (1945-1969)

gaoppThursday, August 25 from 7 to 9 p.m.
Museum

Collector John Fagundes presents an illustrated talk on the great photographers of the physique tradition. Post-World War II America saw the rise of this genre of commercial homoerotic photography operating within, and often challenging, the rigid confines of censorship laws. Coexisting with the onset of the pre-Stonewall movement for homosexual rights, physique images confronted mainstream society’s restrictions on photographs reflecting gay male desire. Fagundes will focus on the work of Douglas of Detroit, Bruce of Los Angeles, Bob Mizer (Athletic Model Guild) and Jim French (Colt Studios) as well as their predecessors who established a new aesthetic of the male nude with a particular appeal for gay men. Admission $5; free for members.

COMPTON’S RIOT: Screaming Queens

Thursday, August 18 from 7 to 9 p.m.
Roxie Theater | 3117 16th Street, San Francisco
Tickets $12

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A late night scene inside Compton’s Cafeteria with patrons who had attended an Imperial Court event (circa 1966). Photo from the Henry Leleu collection.

The Tenderloin Museum and the GLBT History Museum cosponsor a special 10th-anniversary showing of the Emmy Award-winning 2006 documentary Screaming Queens: The Riot at Compton’s Cafeteria, followed by a Q&A with directors Susan Stryker and Victor Silverman. The film uncovered and popularized the then-forgotten 1966 riot at Compton’s.

Susan Stryker is associate professor of gender and women’s studies and former director of the Institute for LGBT Studies at the University of Arizona. A leader in the field of transgender studies, she is the author of many articles and several books on transgender and queer topics, most recently Transgender History (Seal Press 2008). She won a Lambda Literary Award for the anthology The Transgender Studies Reader (Routledge 2006).

Victor Silverman is an award-winning filmmaker, historian and author. His current film, Getting High, is a provocative, feature-length documentary about his family’s collision with drugs and alcohol set against a backdrop of American society’s bitter conflicts around the “war on drugs.” Silverman’s latest book, coauthored with poet Laurie Glover, is California: On the Road Histories (Interlink, 2012).

Remaining programs in the series
Thursday, September 1
7 p.m.
GLBT History Museum Sex Work in the Tenderloin Then and Now Cancelled
Thursday, September 8
8 p.m.
Tenderloin Museum Vanguard Revisited with Rev. Megan Rohrer

Dr. Magnus Hirschfeld exhibition opening reception

mhbooksFriday, August 19 from 7 to 9 p.m.
Museum

Through Knowledge to Justice: The Sexual World of Dr. Magnus Hirschfeld (1868-1935) offers an introduction to the German physician’s life, work and legacy through first editions, vintage periodicals and ephemera largely drawn from the collection assembled by curator Gerard Koskovich over the past three decades. In addition, the exhibition will include historic film documenting Hirschfeld’s impact and the fate of his work.

“Although the Nazi regime did its best to erase the memory of Hirschfeld and his contributions, it didn’t succeed. We remember Hirschfeld today not only because he helped found the movement to defend LGBTQ people more than a century ago, but also because his work as a sexologist was prescient,” Koskovich said. “With its emphasis on ‘sexual intermediacy,’ Hirschfeld’s thinking prefigures contemporary ideas about the continuum of sexual orientation, genderqueer expression and sexual fluidity.”

Join us for a reception to celebrate the opening of this unique exhibition which runs through November 23. Admission: $5.

COMPTON’S RIOT: Art launch and artist talk

crmugTuesday, August 16 from 7 to 9 p.m.
Museum

Don’t miss this launch party for Compton’s 50th Anniversary, featuring works by ceramic artist Nicki Green and interdisciplinary artist Chris Vargas commissioned by the GLBT Historical Society. Green is producing a limited-edition signature coffee mug referencing both Compton’s Cafeteria and the riot itself, while Vargas is hand-screening a numbered set of commemorative t-shirts from his own design. In conversation, the artists will discuss their creative processes and the relationship between trans history and art. Both works will be available for a limited time exclusively at the GLBT History Museum and the Tenderloin Museum.

Green is a trans-disciplinary artist whose work focuses on craft processes that document history and create legacy for marginalized communities. She has exhibited her work nationally, notably at the Leslie-Lohman Museum in New York City and the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco. Vargas is an artist whose work deploys humor and performance in conjunction with mainstream idioms to explore the complex ways that queer and trans people negotiate spaces for themselves within historical and institutional memory and popular culture. Vargas also serves as executive director of MOTHA: The Museum of Transgender Hirstory and Art. Admission: $5; free for members.

Remaining programs in the series
Thursday, August 18
7 p.m.
Roxie Theater Screaming Queens: The Riot at Compton’s Cafeteria
Thursday, September 1
7 p.m.
GLBT History Museum Sex Work in the Tenderloin Then and Now Cancelled
Thursday, September 8
8 p.m.
Tenderloin Museum Vanguard Revisited with Rev. Megan Rohrer

COMPTON’S RIOT: Cruising the Tenderloin in the 1960s

Thursday, August 4 from 7 to 9 p.m.
Museum

poz_100_15_felicia_elizondo[1]Felicia Elizondo, a self-described “Mexican spitfire, screaming queen, pioneer, legend, icon, diva, 29-year survivor of AIDS and Vietnam veteran” was one of the transgender participants in the 1966 Compton’s Cafeteria Riot. In 2015, she was named Lifetime Achievement Grand Marshal of the San Francisco Pride Parade. In this special multimedia presentation, she explores San Francisco’s Tenderloin District in the 1960s to explain how the Compton’s Cafeteria Riot was a defining moment in the struggle by a diverse gay and trans community to claim public lives and become who they were meant to be, paving the way for future generations. Admission: $5; free for members.

Remaining programs in the series
Tuesday, August 16
7 p.m.
GLBT History Museum Compton’s 50th Anniversary Art Launch and Artist Talk
Thursday, August 18
7 p.m.
Roxie Theater Screaming Queens: The Riot at Compton’s Cafeteria
Thursday, September 1
7 p.m.
GLBT History Museum Sex Work in the Tenderloin Then and Now Cancelled
Thursday, September 8
8 p.m.
Tenderloin Museum Vanguard Revisited with Rev. Megan Rohrer

New exhibition honors gay movement pioneer Dr. Magnus Hirschfeld

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Autographed portrait (1926); frontispiece of the first volume of Hirschfeld’s five-volume German-language survey of sexual knowledge.

This year marks the 85th anniversary of Dr. Magnus Hirsch­feld’s visit to San Francisco. Starting in the late 1890s, Hirschfeld was a groundbreaking defender of homosexual and transgender peo­ple in Germany and beyond. He was internationally renowned as a founder of the Scientific-Humanitarian Committee, the world’s first homosexual advocacy group, and as creator of the Institute for Sexual Science in Berlin. Both organizations were banned when the Nazis came to power in 1933. Hirschfeld died in exile three years later.

In a new exhibition opening on August 19, we offer an introduction to Hirschfeld’s life, work and legacy. Through Knowledge to Justice: The Sexual World of Dr. Magnus Hirschfeld (1868-1935) features first editions, vintage periodicals and ephemera largely drawn from the collection assembled by curator Gerard Koskovich over the past three decades. In addition, the exhibition will include historic film documenting Hirschfeld’s impact and the fate of his work.

Curator Gerard Koskovich

“Although the Nazi regime did its best to erase the memory of Hirschfeld and his contributions, it didn’t succeed. We remember Hirschfeld today not only because he helped found the movement to defend LGBTQ people more than a century ago, but also because his work as a sexologist was prescient,” Koskovich said. “With its emphasis on ‘sexual intermediacy,’ Hirschfeld’s thinking prefigures contemporary ideas about the continuum of sexual orientation, genderqueer expression and sexual fluidity.”

Among the scarce artifacts that will be displayed are the 1904 booklet distributed by the Scientific-Humanitarian Committee to advocate repeal of Germany’s sodomy law; one of the handful of volumes known to have survived the first book-burning of the Nazi regime, where the library of Hirschfeld’s Institute for Sexual Science was consigned to the flames; and a review copy of the last of Hirschfeld’s books published during his lifetime, inscribed by the author three weeks before his death in exile in Nice, France.

Through Knowledge to Justice opens August 19 and runs through December. An opening reception will be held on Friday, August 19, at 7 p.m. Admission to the reception: $5.00.

Sponsors: Hermes Foundation, German Consulate General in San Francisco, Jeff Zimman & Ken Ruebush

Cosponsors: Consulate General of France in San Francisco, Goethe-Institut of San Francisco, Magnus-Hirschfeld-Gesellschaft e.V. (Berlin)

RHINO IN THE CASTRO: The Bat

Monday, August 1 from 7 to 9 p.m.
Museum

Albert Rubio as Dale Ogden, Jean Wilcox as Miss Cornelia Van Gorder and Alan Littlehale as Brooks.
Albert Rubio as Dale Ogden, Jean Wilcox as Miss Cornelia Van Gorder and Alan Littlehale as Brooks.

Theatre Rhinoceros, San Francisco’s groundbreaking queer stage company, has teamed up with the GLBT History Museum to present Rhino in the Castro, a series of readings of plays reflecting the LGBTQ community and its allies. The museum provides the space, and Rhino provides the scripts and actors. Performances take place the first Monday of every month.

The second reading in the series is The Bat by Avery Hopwood and Mary Roberts Reinhart. This murder mystery from the 1920s was one of Hopwood’s most popular plays. The most successful American playwright of his time, Hopwood also was gay — but his writing did not deal directly with the topic. The Rhino has engaged Hopwood scholar Jack Sharrar to direct this reading of The Bat, and he’s making gender alterations to the characters to showcase the gay subtext and to reclaim the play for queer history and culture. Admission: free; $5 donation welcomed.

COMPTON’S RIOT: Tenderloin queer history walking tour & kickoff reception

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Thursday, July 28 from 6 to 8:30 p.m.
Tenderloin Museum
398 Eddy Street, San Francisco

For the first program of the Compton’s 50th Anniversary Series, Cruzin d’Loo (the drag alter-ego of performer Kevin Wisney) gives an hour-long walking tour of the LGBTQ history of the Tenderloin centering on the 1966 Compton’s Cafeteria Riot that took place at the now-famous intersection of Turk and Taylor Streets. The tour returns to the museum at 7:00 p.m. for a kickoff reception. Trans historian and award-winning documentary filmmaker Susan Stryker and original “screaming queen” Felicia Elizondo will speak briefly to mark the occasion. Admission: $5.


Thursday, August 4
7 p.m.
GLBT History Museum Cruising the Tenderloin in the 1960s: A Talk by Felicia Elizondo
Tuesday, August 16
7 p.m.
GLBT History Museum Compton’s 50th Anniversary Art Launch and Artist Talk
Thursday, August 18
7 p.m.
Roxie Theater Screaming Queens: The Riot at Compton’s Cafeteria
Thursday, September 1
7 p.m.
GLBT History Museum Sex Work in the Tenderloin Then and Now Cancelled
Thursday, September 8
8 p.m.
Tenderloin Museum Vanguard Revisited with Rev. Megan Rohrer

Workshop: Up the Zines!

Saturday, July 30 from 1 to 4 p.m.
GLBT Historical Society Archives  |  989 Market St., Lower Level  |  San Francisco

Reserve Now

July is International Zine Month! To celebrate, we invite you to join an interactive zine workshop led by Archives Assistant Alex Barrows at our newly opened facility on Market Street.

Zines are self-published works that are easy to make and that serve as alternatives to commercial publishing. They form invaluable sources for processing, asserting and researching sexual and gender identities. Collecting, trading and reviewing zines also fosters community. While the feminist zines of the riot grrrl movement have garnered much scholarly attention in the past several years, this workshop focuses more widely on zines as spaces for multiple gender and sexual identities.

First, we’ll hear tips of the trade from publishing experts Ocean Capwell, Nia King, Queer Anxiety Babiez and Larry-Bob Roberts. During the second part of the workshop, the archives staff will review the basics of zine-making. Workshop participants will create a one-time compilation zine to be preserved and accessible in the GLBT Historical Society Archives. Attendees are encouraged to bring their own supplies to use and share, as well as any of their own LGBTQI-related zines they wish to donate to the archives.

Fee: $5.00; reservations required. The workshop offers a hands-on experience, so only 20 tickets are available. Grab yours now!

Compton’s Cafeteria 50th anniversary series

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Headline discussing the July 18, 1966, protest outside Compton’s Cafeteria that preceded the riot the following month.

Three years before the more famous 1969 Stonewall Riots in New York City, San Francisco’s Tenderloin district erupted with one of the first-known moments of collective queer resistance to persecution by law enforcement. The exact date is lost to history, but on an August night in 1966, drag queens, trans sex workers, hair fairies and gay street hustlers rose up against police harassment in what has come to be known at the Compton’s Cafeteria Riot.

The GLBT History Museum and the Tenderloin Museum in San Francisco are teaming up in July through September to host a series of programs to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the riot. The programs are made possible by additional support from the Roxie Theater and the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence Easter Grant. The full series is open to the public. Events will take place at these San Francisco venues:

The GLBT History Museum. 4127 18th Street in the Castro district.
The Tenderloin Museum. 398 Eddy Street in the Tenderloin district.
The Roxie Theater. 3117 16th Street in the Mission district.

For detailed information on each program, watch our website and like our Facebook page.

Thursday, July 28
6 p.m.
Tenderloin Museum Tenderloin Queer History Walking Tour and Kickoff Reception
Thursday, August 4
7 p.m.
GLBT History Museum Cruising the Tenderloin in the 1960s: A Talk by Felicia Elizondo
Tuesday, August 16
7 p.m.
GLBT History Museum Compton’s 50th Anniversary Art Launch and Artist Talk
Thursday, August 18
7 p.m.
Roxie Theater Screaming Queens: The Riot at Compton’s Cafeteria
Thursday, September 1
7 p.m.
GLBT History Museum Sex Work in the Tenderloin Then and Now Cancelled
Thursday, September 8
8 p.m.
Tenderloin Museum Vanguard Revisited with Rev. Megan Rohrer

Stroke exhibition gallery tour

Friday, July 22 from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.
Museum

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Kent. “The Mechanic” (1992); acrylic and pencil on illustration board.

Join curator Robert Richards and Leslie-Lohman Museum Director Hunter O’Hanian for a lively talk exploring our new Front Gallery exhibition Stroke: From Under the Mattress to the Museum Walls. This showing of 1950s–1990s erotic art comprises twenty-four original illustrations, most drawn from the Leslie-Lohman Museum’s vast collection. Other pieces have been borrowed from private collectors and in some cases from the individual artists. Included in the exhibition will be artwork by Neel Bate (Blade), Michael Breyette, Michael Broderick, Harry Bush, Jim French (Colt), Oliver Frey, Kevin King (BEAU), Michael Kirwan, Touko Laaksonen (Tom of Finland), Antonio Lopez (Antonio), David Martin, Donald Merrick (Domino), Kent Neffendorf (Kent), Olaf Odegaard (Olaf), Mel Odom, Dominic Orejudos (Etienne), Benoît Prévot, George Stavrinos, Rex, Robert W. Richards, Richard Rosenfeld, William Schmelling (Hun), George Quaintance and Frank Webber (Bastille). Admission: $5.00; free for members.

MIGHTY REELS: That’s MS. Leather to You!

Friday, July 29 from 7 to 8:30 p.m.
Museum

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Kick off your Up Your Alley festival weekend with our screening of the first-ever International Ms. Leather competition of 1987. Media preservationist John Raines presents an hour-long video highlighting the excitement, thrills, and laughs of this playful romp held at San Francisco’s long-vanished DV8 Lounge. Since its inception in 1987, International Ms. Leather has become a fixture in the leather and lesbian communities and an annual sibling to Chicago’s International Mr. Leather contest.

ONLINE_Sampler_35_15_LRG[1]Our special guest is Audrey Joseph, a longtime entertainment producer and LGBT rights activist who was closely involved with this inaugural event. Admission: $5; free for members.

Stroke exhibition opening reception

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David Martin. “Boxer” (1980); graphite on paper.

Thursday, July 21 from 7 to 9 p.m.
Museum

Join us for the opening of Stroke: From Under the Mattress to the Museum Walls, a historical retrospective of erotic illustrations from gay men’s magazines from the 1950s to the 1990s. Curated by artist Robert W. Richards, this exhibition of a largely forgotten body of work not only explores the male form, but also offers an examination of erotic fantasies as experienced through publications that were available at nearly every newsstand in America, but that men often hid under their mattresses for fear of being discovered. This showing of 24 authentic illustrations originated at the Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art in New York City. Our San Francisco presentation, its only scheduled appearance on the West Coast, will be on display through mid-October. Admission: $5; free to members.

AFTER HOURS: Decades of Dive Bars

Friday, July 22 from 7 to 9 p.m.
Museum
Advance tickets


Our new monthly party celebrates queer history with dancing and mingling in the galleries after the museum’s regular exhibition hours. This month’s theme is “Decades of Dive Bars” hosted by reigning Grand Duchess Olivia Hart, star of James Hosking’s 2015 documentary, Beautiful By Night: a Tribute to Aunt Charlie’s. Also DJ Bus Station John, drinks and nibbles. Wine and beer sponsor: Virgil’s Sea Room. Admission: $10.

Traveling exhibition of gay erotic art coming in July

Antonio Lopez. "Mike Haire 1" (1983); watercolor and pencil on paper.
Antonio Lopez. “Mike Haire 1” (1983); watercolor and pencil on paper.

From July to October, we present a historical retrospective of erotic illustrations by artists who worked for gay men’s magazines from the 1950s to the 1990s. Stroke: From Under the Mattress to the Museum Walls originated at the Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art in New York City. The San Francisco show is its only scheduled West Coast appearance.

Curated by artist Robert W. Richards, this exhibition of a largely forgotten body of work not only explores the male form, but also offers an examination of erotic fantasies as experienced through publications that were available at nearly every newsstand in America, but that men often hid under their mattresses for fear of being discovered. The exhibition will feature originals of illustrations from the magazines, along with related work that has never been seen publicly.

“Many of the early magazines pretended to be bodybuilding, strength and health journals,” says Richards. “Sometimes they were called anatomy guides for artists. However, most of the men bought these magazines because they were gay. It was nearly their only opportunity to see handsome, well-made, virtually naked men. Buying one of these publications required an act of courage, espe­cially if the small-town drugstore owner had known the buyer and his family most of their lives.”

Stroke runs from July 21 to October 16, 2016 in the Front Gallery. A public opening reception is set for Thursday, July 21 from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. In addition, curator Robert Richards will join Leslie-Lohman Museum Director Hunter O’Hanian in presenting a gallery talk on Friday, July 22, from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Admission for each event is $5.00; free for members of the GLBT Historical Society.

ABOUT THE CURATOR

G63A3023copycopy-682x1024[1]Time Out New York notes that Robert W. Richards “has drawn everything from Paris haute couture to album covers and Broadway and cabaret posters and stars.” But for his many admirers, Richards is best known for his skillful and captivating drawings of sexually charged men. Next magazine observes, “He’s bound to go down in history as one of the gay community’s greatest and most influential artists.”

Now in his fifth decade of drawing, Richards is highly productive as an artist — and he occasionally pauses from his own work to curate exhibitions. At the Leslie-Lohman Museum, Richards curated The Gods of Erotica and a Peter Berlin retrospective. At the Museum of the Society of Illustrators, he curated The Line of Fashion. According to Richards, ”If something moves me, I’m willing to do the work to share it with people who otherwise might not have an opportunity to see what I’ve been fortunate enough to see.”

Archives to re-open June 29

We made it! The voluminous and priceless contents of our archives have been moved into their new location at 989 Market Street in downtown San Francisco. Public access will resume on Wednesday, June 29. All visits are by appointment according to the following schedule:

Members. Wednesdays and Fridays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Non-members. Thursdays from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m.

To request an appointment, please email the reference staff.

Directions

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Entertainer and community emcee Donna Sachet checks out the stacks at our new archives facility.

By BART: Take any San Francisco train to Powell Station, then walk one long block west toward Sixth Street. By Metro: Take any line to Powell Station, then walk one long block west toward Sixth Street. By Streetcar: Take Line F to Market & Taylor (westbound) or Market & Sixth (eastbound). By Bus: Take Lines 6, 7, or 9 to Market & Taylor (westbound) or Lines 6, 9, or 21 to Market & Sixth (eastbound). By Car: Metered street parking is available, but may be very difficult. There is a valet lot off Stevenson Street. Self-parking is available at the Fifth & Mission civic garage.

Historic media come to the ’net

vlcsnap-7327-12-17-08h36m22s451MIGHTY REELS, our ongoing series featuring rare film, video, and audio from the archives, is now viewable at our website. Programs will be posted a few days after they’re presented at the GLBT History Museum in San Francisco. There’s nothing like the experience with a live audience, so we encourage you to attend MIGHTY REELS in person. But if you aren’t able to make it, or would like to see the program again, you can enjoy these historical gems in the comfort of your internet browser.

pit7sOur next museum program, “That’s MS. Leather to You,” is coming July 29 at 7 p.m. See an hour of highlights of the first-ever International Ms. Leather competition of 1987.

Bay Area Reporter editorial: ‘A museum to make us proud’

Read Executive Director Terry Beswick’s editorial from the June 9 Issue of the Bay Area Reporter below — and join us in helping achieve our vision for a new GLBT history museum and cultural center by donating today!

Executive Director Terry Beswick
Executive Director Terry Beswick

We have the new SFMOMA. We have the de Young. George Lucas’ museum is back on the table. This tourist-destination city already boasts a number of great museums, many of them dedicated to cultural or ethnic minorities, and some with substantial underwriting from San Francisco taxpayers.

The larger museums sometimes even include queer artists or LGBTQ subject matter among their exhibits and collections. OK, often we’re just an afterthought, or our sexual orientation and gender identities actually go unmentioned. And all too often, our stories are left out altogether.

So does San Francisco really need a dedicated world-class museum of LGBTQ history and culture? And how do we know people will support it?

The answer is right under our noses.

Now five years old, the GLBT History Museum has run into one major problem: lack of room. We struggle to accommodate curators eager to display our rich history. Those who succeed in getting on the calendar are often frustrated by the amount of space we can provide, leaving them to create shows with less depth than they had hoped. And the museum sponsors popular public programs, only to turn away many who wish to attend because we lack adequate seating.

The heart of the problem — and the opportunity — is the wonderful diversity and range of our history. We come from everywhere and we have so many stories to tell.

Our museum has accomplished a great deal with limited resources. But as GLBT Historical Society founding member Gerard Koskovich recently remarked, “We tested a rowboat — and found out so many people want to come aboard that we need a full-scale cruise ship.”

The current museum is an offshoot of the GLBT Historical Society’s archives and research center. Our storefront galleries in the Castro were never intended to be permanent. They were a trial balloon to see if we could launch a stand-alone museum of queer history — and to measure San Francisco’s willingness to support such an enterprise.

Last year, over 15,000 individuals visited the GLBT History Museum to take in the exhibitions or attend programs, with more than 60 percent of these coming from out of state or out of the country, and with many Bay Area schools and other groups coming for guided tours. It’s an easy way for people from all backgrounds to discover LGBTQ history and go home with a new understanding.

Over the years, there have been a number of efforts to create a full-fledged museum of LGBTQ history and culture — some of them involving the GLBT Historical Society. These efforts did not come to fruition, perhaps because the time or place was not right. Over the last 35 years, an incredible amount of our community’s resources have been appropriately directed toward our very survival in the fight against HIV/AIDS and toward winning our basic civil rights. Much of this work continues today.

At the same time, we have won some major victories and have identified new directions for our movement for social justice. And that means the time has come to fully honor the struggles that have brought us here by creating a new and larger LGBTQ museum and archives — a world-class institution where we can tell our stories in the ways they merit and can welcome everyone who wants and needs to learn about them.

I’m proud to be a part of the GLBT Historical Society — an organization that understands the importance of collecting and sharing the diverse stories of our past. We do this not just to honor our elders and inspire young people, but also to show our full selves to others who may not yet appreciate our history or even our humanity.

With the recent move of our archives to a much larger space in the mid-Market neighborhood, we’re delighted that we finally have room to expand our collections — and we’re committed to using this opportunity to strengthen our documentation of diversity, including the lives of people of color, women, and other underrepresented groups.

But if we’re going to create a full-scale museum to display these collections and other treasures of the LGBTQ past in San Francisco, we need leadership from City Hall and we need to build our capacity for growth. So this month, we’re launching the first phase of our initiative to create a new museum of LGBTQ history and culture. We’ll be taking the following steps:

  • Forming partnerships with the city and with private developers to identify potential sites for a building that will bring the museum and archives together and will provide greatly expanded gallery and program space.
  • Establishing an international advisory board of prominent individuals to offer guidance as we plan a world-class museum.
  • Building the historical society’s capacity for substantial development by increasing revenues and diversifying income streams.

We have four years left on our lease for the GLBT History Museum in the Castro. We plan to use this time to move forward with creating a new, full-fledged museum of LGBTQ history and culture. We believe our community has earned it, we believe the time is right, and we believe San Francisco is the place to build it. We invite you to join us in this quest.

Philadelphia Freedom: Gay Patriots, Protesters & Profiteers at the Bicentennial

Thursday, July 7 from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Museum

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Marc Stein and Philadelphia’s Independence Hall

Historian Marc Stein queers Independence Day by examining the U.S. Bicentennial in 1976, when disaster resulted from the strange political courtship that had linked Republican President Richard Nixon and Democratic Philadelphia Mayor Frank Rizzo; the gay porn magazine Mandate published a fashion spread titled “Philadelphia Freedom”; and LGBTQ patriots, protesters and profiteers marked the national birthday. A professor of history at San Francisco State and author of three books including City of Sisterly and Brotherly Loves: Lesbian and Gay Philadelphia, 1945-1972  (University of Chicago Press, 2000), Stein reveals the cultural and political significance of a nearly forgotten moment of the 1970s when LGBTQ people claimed a place in a national spectacle. Admission: $5.00; free for members of the GLBT Historical Society.

RHINO IN THE CASTRO: Swollen Tongues

Tuesday, July 5 from 7 to 9 p.m.
Museum

Theatre Rhinoceros, San Francisco’s groundbreaking LGBTQ stage company, teams up with the GLBT Historical Society to present Rhino in the Castro, a monthly series of play readings reflecting the LGBTQ community and its allies. The museum provides the space, and Rhino provides the scripts and actors. Performances will take place the first week of every month.

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Playwright Kathleen Oliver
The first staged reading features Swollen Tongues by Kathleen Oliver. Written in rhyming couplets, the play is a take on Restoration comedy with a contemporary twist. Thomas and his sister Catherine are both receiving instruction in the powers of poetry from their tutor, Dr. Wise. While Thomas is more prolific than skilled in his praise of his beloved, Sonja, Catherine is strangely mute. The problem? Catherine is secretly in love with Sonja, too. Admission: free; $5 donation encouraged.