By eureka

LIVING HISTORY ACT(ing) UP: 30 Years of Nonviolent Direct Action

LIVING HISTORY
ACT(ing) UP: 30 Years of Nonviolent Direct Action
Tuesday, March 28
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
The GLBT History Museum
4127 18th St., San Francisco
Admission: $5.00; free for members
Militants from Stop AIDS Now or Else (SANOE) hold a sit-in on the Golden Gate Bridge, Jan. 31, 1989. Photo Copyright © Rick Gerharter.
Thirty years ago this month, the first chapter of the militant AIDS activist organization ACT UP was founded in New York City. At the same time, the AIDS Action Pledge was forming in San Francisco, emerging from earlier AIDS protest groups in the city, including Citizens for Medical Justice, Mobilization Against AIDS and the ARC/AIDS Vigil. The first in a new monthly series called “Fighting Back!” sponsored by the GLBT Historical Society, this intergenerational discussion will feature veterans of those early groups as well as contemporary organizers of LGBTQ nonviolent direct action who will lead a public forum exploring the effectiveness of such efforts in creating change.

Rhino in the Castro: “She Kills Monsters” by Qui Nguyen

STAGED READING   
Rhino in the Castro: “She Kills Monsters” by Qui Nguyen
Monday, February 6
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
The GLBT History Museum
Admission: Free; $5.00 donation welcome
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Playwright Qui Nguyen. Photo: Mark Dawson

Theatre Rhinoceros, San Francisco’s groundbreaking queer stage company, has teamed up with the GLBT History Museum to present “Rhino in the Castro,” a series of readings of plays reflecting the LGBTQ community and our allies. The museum provides the space, and Rhino provides the scripts and actors.

This month’s offering is “She Kills Monsters,” a drama by Qui Nguyen. Agnes regrets that she never got to know her teenage sister, Tilly, who was killed in a car accident. But when Agnes ventures into Tilly’s world of Dungeons and Dragons, she discovers a Tilly she didn’t know existed, along with Tilly’s girlfriend, a few enemies and some unfinished business.

Bearing Witness: Remembering International Bear Rendezvous

LIVING HISTORY
Bearing Witness: Remembering International Bear Rendezvous  
Thursday, February 16
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
The GLBT History Museum
Admission: $5.00; free for members
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Winners of the 2006 International Mr. Bear competition. Photograph by Ted Buel; used with permission from Bears of San Francisco (BOSF).

From 1995 to 2011, the Bears of San Francisco produced International Bear Rendezvous (IBR), an annual gathering that celebrated older, larger, hairier, ruggedly masculine gay men who had been largely excluded from standards of attractiveness in gay popular culture. Guests arrived from throughout the U.S. and beyond for a Presidents Day weekend of fun, fundraising and friendship, culminating in the International Mr. Bear competition on Sunday evening. In its 17 years, IBR raised more $500,000 for LGBTQ charities. For this living history panel, organizers and participants will come together for an evening of laughter, insight and remembering about this foundational event for the bear community.

Missing You: Queer Memory in the Mission

MISSING YOU: Queer Memory in the Mission
Saturday, February 18
6 p.m.
Brava Theater Center 2781 24th Street, SF
$10 ADVANCE • $15 AT THE DOOR
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RADAR Productions presents an investigation of queer memory through storytelling, film and drag designed to unearth and materialize queer ghosts that linger in San Francisco’s Mission District. Includes storytelling by Still Here, performance by Persia and special guests, and a showing of the 1994 documentary ¡Viva 16! Cosponsored by GLBT Historical Society.

Gay Men & Lesbians: We Still Like Each Other, Right?

COMMUNITY FORUM 
Gay Men & Lesbians: We Still Like Each Other, Right?  

Wednesday, February 22
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
The GLBT History Museum
Admission: Free
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Lesbians and gay men joining together to demand equal rights at the National March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights, Washington, D.C. (October 11, 1987). Photo courtesy Brian Thorstenson.

Queer theater artists Tracy Ward, Brian Thorstenson and Patricia Cotter are developing a stage work about the connections between lesbians and gay men. As part of their research, they’re hosting this open forum to explore how men and women in the queer community have formed friendships, chosen family, collaboration in work and activism, and other kinds of relationships. When the country seems more divided than ever, the gathering will involve an open, honest and fun discussion of divisions and connections within the community. Some of the stories might even find their way on to the stage. All ages, opinions and genders are welcome.

Lavender & Red: Liberation and Solidarity in the Gay and Lesbian Left

AUTHOR TALK
Lavender & Red: Liberation and Solidarity in the Gay and Lesbian Left

Monday, February 27
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
The GLBT History Museum
Admission: $5.00; Free for Members
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Emily Hobson, author of Lavender and Red. Photo courtesy of the author.
Front cover of Lavender and Red by Emily K. Hobson.
 Emily Hobson will discuss her new book,  Lavender and Red: Liberation and Solidarity in the Gay and Lesbian Left  (University of California Press, 2016), a history of queer radicalism in the San Francisco Bay Area from the late 1960s through the Reagan-Bush years. Drawing on extensive research at the GLBT Historical Society, Hobson shows how gay and lesbian leftists defined sexual liberation through solidarity against racism, imperialism and war. Her use of archives, oral histories and images
rediscovers the radical queer past for a generation of activists today. Hobson serves as assistant professor of history and gender, race and identity at the University of Nevada, Reno.

Voices of the Past: Capturing LGBTQ Oral Histories

Wednesday, February 1    
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
The GLBT History Museum
4127 18th St., San Francisco
Admission: Free 

The GLBT Historical Society is relaunching its “Oral History Project,” an initiative to record interviews with community elders who’ll share their recollections of the LGBTQ past. Such interviews often provide the only record of aspects of everyday life in decades gone by, particularly for LGBTQ people from underrepresented groups. The project will offer numerous volunteer opportunities, from conducting interviews and researching background histories to providing technical assistance or offering general support. This volunteer-orientation evening will provide all the details you’ll need to get involved.

Rhino in the Castro: “Tenn” by Kathy Boussina  

tenn
Monday, January 9th
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
The GLBT History Museum
4127 18th St., San Francisco
Admission: Free. $5 donation welcome

Theatre Rhinoceros, San Francisco’s groundbreaking queer stage company, has teamed up with the GLBT History Museum to present “Rhino in the Castro,” a series of readings of plays reflecting the LGBTQ community and our allies. The museum provides the space, and Rhino provides the scripts and actors.

This month’s offering is “Tenn” by Kathy Boussina, an evocation of celebrated gay playwright Tennessee Williams and his longtime lover, Frank Merlo, viewed through the lens of the unconventional therapeutic relationship that develops between Williams and his psychoanalyst. As the story unfolds, Williams’s haunted past surfaces and Frank struggles to save his partner and keep their love intact.

Meet the Artist: The Lone Star Saloon Welcomes Cartoonist Fran Frisch

frisch
Wednesday, January 25  
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
Lone Star Saloon
1354 Harrison St., San Francisco
Admission: Free

 

In conjunction with “Beartoonist of San Francisco: Sketching an Emerging Subculture,” an exhibition opening January 27 at the GLBT History Museum,
artist Fran Frisch will welcome his fans and sell and inscribe prints of his work from the 1980s to the present at an informal reception at the Lone Star Saloon. Curator Jeremy Prince will be on hand to discuss the exhibition, and popular DJ Bearzbub will provide the musical mix. Co-sponsored by the GLBT Historical Society, Bears of San Francisco and the Lone Star Saloon.

Exhibition Opening | Beartoonist of San Francisco: Sketching an Emerging Subculture 

Friday, January 27
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
The GLBT History Museum
4127 18th St., San Francisco
Admission: $5. Free for members

A new exhibition featuring the work of cartoonist Fran Frisch as a starting point for exploring the community of bears, a subculture that developed in the 1980s to celebrate older, larger, hairier, ruggedly masculine gay men who were largely excluded from standards of attractiveness in gay popular culture. The bear identity created positive self-images and an affirming subculture beyond the narrow concepts of gay masculinity and eroticism that prevailed at the time.

Covering the mid-1980s to the mid-2000s, the exhibition will focus on San Francisco, one of the key places where the bear community first emerged before becoming an international phenomenon. “Beartoonist of San Francisco” will include original art by Frisch, along with photographs, objects and ephemera from the collection of curator Jeremy Prince and the archives of the GLBT Historical Society. Drinks for the reception will be sponsored by 440 Castro.

Exhibition Talk: Putting Bear History on Display        

Saturday, January 28 

4:30 – 6:30 p.m.
The GLBT History Museum
4127 18th St., San Francisco
Admission: $5. Free for members

Curator Jeremy Prince will join cartoonist Fran Frisch in presenting an informal gallery talk about “Beartoonist of San Francisco: Sketching an Emerging Subculture,” a new exhibition at the GLBT History Museum that focuses on the bear subculture that developed in the 1980s to celebrate older, larger, hairier, ruggedly masculine gay men. Frisch will discuss his more than three decades of work portraying the bear community, and Prince will describe the purposes of the exhibition and the processes involved in creating the show.