Fighting Back: Gender Labels — Then & Now

Fighting Back: Gender Labels — Then & Now
Tuesday, August 22
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
The GLBT History Museum
4127 18th St., San Francisco
Admission: Free | $5.00 donation welcome


Transvestia magazine (October 1964), an early national journal for gender-variant individuals. Archives of the GLBT Historical Society.

The latest in the GLBT Historical Society’s monthly “Fighting Back” series exploring contemporary queer-community issues in a historical context, “Gender Labels: Then and Now” will offer a multigenerational conversation about the changing dynamics of gender labels within the LGBTQ community and among the general public.

A panel of historians, authors and activists will discuss the history of gender self-identification and gender-label assignment and will look at how this history can inform today’s evolving language for characterizing gender in the media, the workplace, social-justice movements and everyday conversation.

PANELISTS

Alecs (aka: Sailor) has been playing around with the significance of words and labels and their meanings in different marginalized communities, especially the trans community and gender and sexually nonconforming communities for many years. She is an avid writer, occasional workshop presenter, and committed volunteer who lives and plays in and around San Francisco.

Alexsarah “Golden” Collier is a media activist, musician and writer from the deep, black, magical South. Collier is executive director of Double Union, the nation’s largest feminist makerspace and community workshop, creator of the Womanist Trilliance on Soundcloud, and member of the Sula Collective and Sister Worldwide. Collier also is a teaching member of Girl Army, an Oakland collective providing strengths-based, sliding-scale self-defense for women, and gender nonconforming and trans folks.

Ola Osaze is a 2017 Soros Justice Fellow and a national organizer with LGBTQ Black Immigrant Justice, a project of the Transgender Law Center. He is a Nigerian immigrant with over 10 years’ experience in resource development, community organizing and program management, working for such organizations as the Opportunity Agenda, the Sylvia Rivera Law Project, Queers for Economic Justice and CAAAV Organizing Asian Communities. As a community activist, Osaze cofounded TransJustice at the Audre Lorde Project in New York City and was involved with Uhuru Wazobia, the first LGBTQ groups for African immigrants in New York.

Don Romesburg is professor of women’s and gender studies at Sonoma State University. He is editor of the Routledge History of Queer America (2018) and has published in numerous journals and anthologies with queer takes on public history as well as histories of adolescence, sex work, transracial adoption, family and queer/trans performers. He was the lead scholar working to bring LGBTQ content into California’s 2016 K-12 History-Social Science Framework. Romesburg is a cofounder of the GLBT History Museum.

Julia Serano is the author of three books, Whipping Girl: A Transsexual Woman on Sexism and the Scapegoating of Femininity (now in second edition); Excluded: Making Feminist and Queer Movements More Inclusive; and Outspoken: A Decade of Transgender Activism and Trans Feminism. Her writings have also appeared in numerous anthologies and media outlets, and have been used as teaching materials in queer and gender-studies courses across North America.

MODERATOR

Gina White has been taking a break from a decades-long software engineering career while she considers what she is going to do when she grows up. Most of her volunteer efforts go toward queer and women-focused nonprofits. She recently led a group of first-year law students on a visit to conduct legal interviews of trans women who were being held in a men’s state prison. She is extremely proud that these students considered this to be one of the most valuable experiences of their summer.